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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Factors affecting bycatch in a developing New Zealand scampi potting fishery

Published source details

Major R.N., Taylor D.I., Connor S., Connor G. & Jeffs A.G. (2017) Factors affecting bycatch in a developing New Zealand scampi potting fishery. Fisheries Research, 186, 55-64


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Use different bait species in traps Subtidal Benthic Invertebrate Conservation

A replicated, controlled study in 2014–2015 in two seabed areas in the South Pacific Ocean, New Zealand (Major et al. 2017) found that the type of bait used in the New Zealand scampi Metanephros challengeri pot fishery did not change the amount of unwanted invertebrates caught, in either area. The amount of unwanted invertebrates caught was similar in pots baited with mackerel Scomber australasicus, barracouta Thyrsites atun, or squid Nototodarus sloanii (abundance data not shown). In two areas, three bait species were tested: mackerel vs squid, and barracouta vs squid (mackerel vs barracouta not tested). At Chatham Rise from November–December 2014, traps baited with either mackerel or squid (equal number of traps) were tested during three deployments (three 500 m lines of 30 traps/deployment). At Cape Palliser in April 2015, traps baited with either barracouta or squid (equal number of traps) were tested during three deployments (one 500 m line of 30 traps/deployment). Traps were recovered after 18 hours, and unwanted invertebrate catch identified and counted.

(Summarised by Anaëlle Lemasson)

Modify the design of traps Subtidal Benthic Invertebrate Conservation

A replicated, controlled study in 2014–2015 in two areas of seabed in the South Pacific Ocean, New Zealand (Major et al. 2017) found that four different trap designs used to catch New Zealand scampi Metanephros challengeri caught different amount of unwanted catch of combined invertebrates and fish, but the effects varied between areas. In one area, rectangular traps caught more unwanted catch (2 individuals/trap) than box traps and standard traps (1 individual/trap; no difference between the two designs). In the other site, rectangular traps caught more unwanted catch (8 individuals/trap) than boxed traps (3 individuals/trap), and both caught more than domed plastic traps and standard traps (1 individual/trap; no difference between the two designs). Four different trap designs were tested in two areas: a standard creel trap, a box shaped creel trap, a rectangular shaped creel trap and a domed plastic trap. At Chatham Rise from November–December 2014, three designs (rectangular, box, standard) were tested during three deployments (three 500 m lines of 30 baited traps/deployment; 10 traps/design/line). At Cape Palliser in April 2015, all four designs were tested during three deployments (one 500 m line of 30 baited traps/deployment; 7–10 traps/design/line). Traps were recovered after 18 hours, and unwanted catch identified and counted.

(Summarised by Anaëlle Lemasson)