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Individual study: Prey base shifts in red rock lobster Jasus edwardsii in response to habitat conversion in Fiordland marine reserves: implications for effective spatial management

Published source details

Jack L., Wing S. & McLeod R. (2009) Prey base shifts in red rock lobster Jasus edwardsii in response to habitat conversion in Fiordland marine reserves: implications for effective spatial management. Marine Ecology Progress Series, 381, 213-222


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Designate a Marine Protected Area and prohibit all types of fishing Subtidal Benthic Invertebrate Conservation

A replicated, site comparison study in 2006–2007 of 11 rocky seabed sites in Fiordland, Tasman Sea, New Zealand (Jack et al. 2009) found that the effects of marine protected areas prohibiting all fishing (no-take reserves) on the abundance of red rock lobsters Jasus edwardssi and percentage cover of its prey, the mussels Mytilus edulis galloprovincialis, Perna canaliculus, and Aulacomya maoriana, compared to a commercial fishing exclusion zone, varied with the age and location of the protected areas. Lobster abundance was higher in the >13-year-old no-take reserve established in 1993 (36 individuals/250 m2) compared to one of two <2-year-old no-take reserves established in 2005 (Kutu Parera; 11 individuals/250 m2) and the commercial exclusion zone (9 individuals/250 m2). The second <2-year-old no-take reserve (Taipari Roa) had no lobsters. Mussel cover was higher in the >13-year-old reserve (28%) compared to the exclusion zone (15%), and cover at Kutu Parera (18%) was not different from either the >13-year-old reserve or the exclusion zone. No mussels were found at Taipari Roa. Lobsters and mussels were surveyed by divers at two sites in each of the following: a no-take reserve established in 1993, and two no-take reserves established in 2005, and at five sites within a commercial exclusion zone set in 2005 (15 m depth). During six surveys in 2006–2007, red rock lobsters were counted along 50 × 10 m transects (1–4 transects/site/survey). The percentage cover of mussels (species combined) was estimated from 25 photographs (0.17 m2)/site taken during a single survey in 2007.

(Summarised by Anaëlle Lemasson)