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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Effects of fishing on a temperate reef community in South Africa 2: benthic invertebrates and algae

Published source details

Götz A., Kerwath S.E., Attwood C.G. & Sauer W.H. (2009) Effects of fishing on a temperate reef community in South Africa 2: benthic invertebrates and algae. African Journal of Marine Science, 31, 253-262


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Designate a Marine Protected Area and introduce some fishing restrictions (types unspecified) Subtidal Benthic Invertebrate Conservation

A site comparison study in 2001–2004 in areas of seabed in the Indian Ocean, off the south coast of South Africa (Götz et al. 2009) found that sites inside a marine protected area closed to fishing (exact restrictions unspecified) had a different overall invertebrate and algae community composition and abundances of three of five species groups compared to adjacent fished sites. Community data were presented as graphical analyses. Protected sites had statistically higher abundance (as percentage cover) of sponges (25%) and hydrozoans (9%) compared to fished sites (sponges: 19%; hydrozoans: 7%), lower abundance of sea lilies (closed: 6% vs fished: 10%), and similar abundances of sea quirts (15% vs 13%) and bryozoans (20% vs 24%) than fished sites. Annually in 2001–2004, video footage was recorded at 10–30 m depth at 2–7 sites surveyed inside the protected area (year of designation unspecified), and 4–13 sites outside. At each site, a 225 m2 area was video-recorded. Footage was analysed and cover of five invertebrate taxa and algae assessed.

(Summarised by Anaëlle Lemasson & Laura Pettit)