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Individual study: Role of the source community for the recovery of seagrass associated meiofauna: a field colonisation experiment with seagrass mimics in Diani Beach, Kenya

Published source details

Daudi L., Uku J. & De T.M. (2013) Role of the source community for the recovery of seagrass associated meiofauna: a field colonisation experiment with seagrass mimics in Diani Beach, Kenya. African Journal of Marine Science, 35, 1-8


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Restore biogenic habitats (other methods) - Restore seagrass beds/meadows Subtidal Benthic Invertebrate Conservation

A replicated, controlled study in 2008 of 12 seagrass sites in Diani Beach, Indian Ocean, south coast of Kenya (Daudi et al. 2013) found that transplanting plastic seagrass mimics into either bare sites, previously-restored seagrass sites, or natural seagrass sites, resulted in different abundance of invertebrates on mimic leaves between sites after 21 days, but similar diversity of invertebrates on mimic leaves, and similar diversity and abundance of invertebrates in the surrounding sediment (values not reported). Abundance on mimic leaves was higher on the natural (39 individuals/100 cm2) and bare (49) sites, compared to the previously-restored sites (12), but remained lower on all mimic leaves compared to natural seagrass leaves (83). However, species richness on all mimic leaves (10) appeared similar to that of natural seagrass leaves (11) (not statistically tested). Invertebrate abundances in the sediment were not reported. There were nine sites (0.7 m depth): three bare (no natural seagrass), three previously-restored (one year previously by transplanting natural seagrass, but damaged overwinter), and three natural seagrass sites. Three plastic seagrass mimics (cluster of four plants) were transplanted to each site in August 2008. After 21 days, invertebrates (38 µm–1 mm in size) living on the leaves and in the sediment around each mimic were identified and counted (see paper for details). Three natural seagrass sites without transplanted mimics were sampled for comparison.

(Summarised by Anaëlle Lemasson)