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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Indirect effects of protection from exploitation:patterns from populations of Evechinus chloroticus (Echinoidea) in northeastern New Zealand

Published source details

Cole R. & Keuskamp D. (1998) Indirect effects of protection from exploitation:patterns from populations of Evechinus chloroticus (Echinoidea) in northeastern New Zealand. Marine Ecology Progress Series, 173, 215-226


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Designate a Marine Protected Area and prohibit all types of fishing Subtidal Benthic Invertebrate Conservation

A paired, site comparison study in 1992–1997 of six coralline seabed areas in the South Pacific Ocean, northeastern New Zealand (Cole & Keuskamp 1998) found that inside marine protected areas prohibiting all fishing for more than 10 years Kina sea urchins Evechinus chloroticus tended to be heavier compared to adjacent fished areas, but that all areas appeared to have similar urchin abundance. Results were not statistically tested. Sea urchins tended to be heavier inside protected areas (average 54 g), compared to fished areas (40 g). Sea urchin abundance varied between 1 to 4 urchin/m2 in protected areas, and 1 to 7 urchin/m2 in fished areas. Three marine protected areas prohibiting all exploitation (assumed to include all fishing) and three paired adjacent fished areas were sampled between 1992 and 1997 (4–5 sites/area; 5–10 m depth). Divers counted all urchins in twenty 1 m2 quadrats and measured the diameter of at least 60 urchins. In one protected and one fished area, the skeletons of ten sea urchins (55–65 mm diameter)/site were wet-weighed.

(Summarised by Anaëlle Lemasson)