Study

The cost and feasibility of marine coastal restoration

  • Published source details Bayraktarov E., Saunders M.I., Abdullah S., Mills M., Beher J., Possingham H.P., Mumby P.J. & Lovelock C.E. (2016) The cost and feasibility of marine coastal restoration. Ecological Applications, 26, 1055-1074

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Restore biogenic habitats (other methods) - Restore oyster reefs

Action Link
Subtidal Benthic Invertebrate Conservation

Introduce seeds of non-woody plants: brackish/saline wetlands

Action Link
Marsh and Swamp Conservation

Introduce tree/shrub seeds or propagules: brackish/saline wetlands

Action Link
Marsh and Swamp Conservation

Directly plant non-woody plants: brackish/saline wetlands

Action Link
Marsh and Swamp Conservation

Directly plant trees/shrubs: brackish/saline wetlands

Action Link
Marsh and Swamp Conservation
  1. Restore biogenic habitats (other methods) - Restore oyster reefs

    A systematic review conducted in 2014 of studies from across the world (Bayraktarov et al. 2016) found that following oyster reef restoration projects, the survival of oysters varied with the restoration technique used. Comparing nine different techniques, the survival of oysters varied between 0% and 100% (survival for each technique not shown). Two of the nine restoration techniques (restoring oyster reef by transplanting juveniles, and by creating no-harvest sanctuaries) resulted in over 85% survival of restored oysters. A systematic review of the literature available by 21 November 2014 on the feasibility, survival, and costs of oyster reef restoration was conducted. Out of the 81 studies found on oyster reef restoration, 24 studies were included in the systematic review. Data on the restoration technique used and survival of “restored oysters” (exact definition not stated) were extracted and analysed.

    (Summarised by: Anaëlle Lemasson)

  2. Introduce seeds of non-woody plants: brackish/saline wetlands

    A 2016 systematic review of salt marsh restoration studies around the world (Bayraktarov et al. 2016) reported a 65% average survival rate of sown and planted vegetation. Survival ranged from 0% (2 of 64 cases) to ≥95% (7 of 64 cases). Methods: These results are based on 64 cases (e.g. different species, environments or intervention methods) from 16 publications and five countries, 63 of which involved sowing or planting salt marsh vegetation (mostly herbs and succulents, sometimes shrubs; see Appendix to original paper). Literature searches were carried out in 2014. Sowing and planting were sometimes into environments thought to be suitable (but sometimes into hostile environments) and sometimes preceded by site preparation (but sometimes not). Study duration ranged from 20 days to 13 years. Survival was sometimes estimated from other metrics, such as cover. The review does not separate results for sowing vs planting. The review does not include any of the other studies summarized for this action.

    (Summarised by: Nigel Taylor)

  3. Introduce tree/shrub seeds or propagules: brackish/saline wetlands

    A 2016 systematic review of mangrove restoration studies around the world (Bayraktarov et al. 2016) reported a 51% average survival rate of sown mangrove propagules and planted mangrove trees. Survival ranged from 0% (17 of 106 cases) to ≥95% (15 of 106 cases). The average survival rate was 56% in developed countries and 45% in developing countries. Methods: The review was based on 106 cases (e.g. different species, environments or intervention methods) from 28 publications and at least 17 countries, 104 of which involved sowing or planting mangroves (see Appendix to original paper). Literature searches were carried out in 2014. Sowing and planting were sometimes into environments thought to be suitable (but sometimes into hostile environments) and were sometimes preceded by site preparation (but sometimes not). Study duration ranged from one month to 21 years. Survival was sometimes estimated from other metrics, such as cover. The review does not separate results for survival of sown propagules vs planted seedlings. The review includes studies (4) and (10) summarized above.

    (Summarised by: Nigel Taylor)

  4. Directly plant non-woody plants: brackish/saline wetlands

    A 2016 systematic review of salt marsh restoration studies around the world (Bayraktarov et al. 2016) reported a 65% average survival rate of planted and sown vegetation. Survival ranged from 0% (2 of 64 cases) to ≥95% (7 of 64 cases). Methods: These results are based on 64 cases (e.g. different species, environments or intervention methods) from 16 publications and five countries, 63 of which involved planting or sowing salt marsh vegetation (mostly herbs and succulents, sometimes shrubs; see Appendix to original paper). Literature searches were carried out in 2014. Planting and sowing were sometimes into environments thought to be suitable (but sometimes into hostile environments) and sometimes preceded by site preparation (but sometimes not). Study duration ranged from 20 days to 13 years. Survival was sometimes estimated from other metrics, such as cover. The review does not separate results for planting vs sowing. The review includes studies (10), (14), (16), (17), (19), (20) and (25) summarized above.

    (Summarised by: Nigel Taylor)

  5. Directly plant trees/shrubs: brackish/saline wetlands

    A 2016 systematic review of mangrove restoration studies around the world (Bayraktarov et al. 2016) reported a 51% average survival rate of planted mangrove trees and sown mangrove propagules. Survival ranged from 0% (17 of 106 cases) to ≥95% (15 of 106 cases). The average survival rate was 56% in developed countries and 45% in developing countries. Methods: The review was based on 106 cases (e.g. different species, environments or intervention methods) from 28 publications and at least 17 countries, 104 of which involved planting or sowing mangroves (see Appendix to original paper). Literature searches were carried out in 2014. Planting and sowing were sometimes into environments thought to be suitable (but sometimes into hostile environments) and were sometimes preceded by site preparation (but sometimes not). Study duration ranged from one month to 21 years. Survival was sometimes estimated from other metrics, such as cover. The review does not separate results for survival of planted seedlings vs sown propagules. The review includes studies (1), (6), (29), (30) and (36) summarized above.

    (Summarised by: Nigel Taylor)

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