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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Cryptic invertebrates on subtidal rocky reefs vary with microhabitat structure and protection from fishing

Published source details

Alexander T. (2013) Cryptic invertebrates on subtidal rocky reefs vary with microhabitat structure and protection from fishing. Marine Ecology Progress Series, 481, 93-104


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Designate a Marine Protected Area and prohibit all types of fishing Subtidal Benthic Invertebrate Conservation

A replicated, site comparison study in 2006–2007 of twelve rocky reef sites in the Tasman Sea, Australia (Alexander 2013) found that sites within a marine reserve prohibiting all fishing for 16 years had statistically similar combined mollusc and echinoderm species richness, abundance, and community composition to sites outside the reserve subject to fishing. Species richness and abundance data were not reported. Community composition data were reported as a graphical analysis. Abundance data were reported for the commercially valuable but declining blacklip abalone Haliotis rubra and was lower inside (0.25–0.29 abalone/boulder) compared to outside (0.62–0.94;) the reserve. In summer 2006–2007, ten boulders (30 × 30 × 5 cm) were deployed at each of 12 sites: six within the reserve (declared in 1991) and six outside. Boulders were recovered in January 2007 after three months, and molluscs (including blacklip abalone) and echinoderms present on their underside identified and counted. This was repeated in autumn and winter 2007.

(Summarised by Anaëlle Lemasson)