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Individual study: Care and management of the long-tongued bat, Glossophaga soricina (Chiroptera: Phyllostomatidae), in the laboratory, with observations on estivation induced by food deprivation

Published source details

Rasweiler J.J. IV (1973) Care and management of the long-tongued bat, Glossophaga soricina (Chiroptera: Phyllostomatidae), in the laboratory, with observations on estivation induced by food deprivation. Journal of Mammalogy, 54, 391-404


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Breed bats in captivity Bat Conservation

A study in 1968–1970 in a flight room at Cornell University, USA (Rasweiler 1973) found that five of 18 pregnant Pallas’s long-tongued bats Glossophaga soricina gave birth to live young, and one of five bat pups born was successfully reared to adulthood. Four of five bat pups were rejected by their mothers. Bats were collected from the wild in Trinidad in February 1968 (93 males, 23 females) and July 1968 (173 females) and transported to the university 2–7 days after capture. All bats were kept in a darkened flight room at 24–26˚C with wood and wire cages for roosting. They were fed on peach nectar with added minerals. One to three males were added to cages with 15–20 females to encourage breeding. Observations were made for up to 584 days after bats were captured in 1968–1970.

(Summarised by Anna Berthinussen)