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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: The efficacy of nestboxes versus spotlighting for detecting feathertail gliders

Published source details

Ward S.J. (2000) The efficacy of nestboxes versus spotlighting for detecting feathertail gliders. Wildlife Research, 75-79


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Provide bat boxes for roosting bats Bat Conservation

A study in 1994–1997 in one forest site in Victoria, Australia (Ward 2000) found that lesser long-eared bats Nyctophilus geoffroyi, large forest bats Vespadelus darlingtoni, southern forest bats Vespadelus regulus and eastern false pipistrelles Falsistrellus tasmaniensis used nest boxes. A total of 73 bats of the four species were captured in nest boxes installed for feathertail gliders Acrobates pygmaeus. In July 1994, forty nest boxes were installed in a 7 ha area of forest dominated by Eucalyptus spp. Boxes were 50 m apart, had a 15 mm-wide entrance hole and were attached to tree trunks at 4.5 m above the ground. Nest boxes were checked approximately every two months between July 1995 and May 1997.

(Summarised by Anna Berthinussen)

Provide artificial dens or nest boxes on trees Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A study in 1994–1996 in a forest site Victoria, Australia (Ward 2000) found that nest boxes were used by feathertail gliders Acrobates pygmaeus and agile antechinus Antechinus agilis. Out of 40 nest boxes, feathertail gliders used nine (23%) and agile antechinus used one or two (3-5%). In total, 57 individual feathertail gliders and two agile antechinus used boxes. In January 1994, forty nest boxes were installed in a 7-ha forest area dominated by eucalyptus. Boxes were 50 m apart, had a 15-mm-wide slit as the entrance and were attached to tree trunks at approximately 4.5 m above ground. Nest boxes were checked approximately every two months, between July 1995 and May 1997. Inspections took place during daylight hours and all animals encountered were captured, individually marked and returned to the box.

(Summarised by Ricardo Rocha)