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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Relationships between bat occupancy and habitat and landscape structure along a savanna, woodland, forest gradient in the Missouri Ozarks

Published source details

Starbuck C.A., Amelon S.K. & Thompson F.R. III (2015) Relationships between bat occupancy and habitat and landscape structure along a savanna, woodland, forest gradient in the Missouri Ozarks. Wildlife Society Bulletin, 39, 20-30


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Use prescribed burning Bat Conservation

A replicated, controlled, site comparison study in 2010–2012 in 26 savanna and woodland sites in Missouri, USA (Starbuck et al. 2015) found that prescribed burning increased occupancy rates of burned sites for one of five bat species. Occupancy rates of the evening bat Nycticeius humeralis increased at burned sites with a greater number of prescribed fires in the past 10 years (data reported as statistical model results). The number of fires did not have a significant effect on the occupancy rates of burned sites for four other bat species (northern long-eared bat Myotis septentrionalis, big brown bat Eptesicus fuscus, eastern red bat Lasiurus borealis, tri-coloured bat Perimyotis subflavus). At each of 26 sites, surveys were carried out at 4–28 sampling points in managed forest and unmanaged mature forest. Managed forests had been burned (with 1–8 fires over 10 years) and thinned to restore savanna or woodland. Bat detectors recorded bat activity at each sampling point for two full consecutive nights during 1–2 years in 2010–2012.

(Summarised by Anna Berthinussen)