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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: The effect of thinning on bat activity in Italian high forests: the LIFE+ "ManFor C.BD." experience

Published source details

Cistrone L., Altea T., Matteucci G., Posillico M., De Cinti B. & Russo D. (2015) The effect of thinning on bat activity in Italian high forests: the LIFE+ "ManFor C.BD." experience. Hystrix, the Italian Journal of Mammalogy, 26, 125-131


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Use selective or reduced impact logging instead of conventional logging Bat Conservation

A replicated, site comparison study in 2014 in three mixed forest sites across Italy (Cistrone et al. 2015) found that ‘innovative’ selective logging resulted in greater bat activity than ‘traditional’ selective logging at two of three sites. Two sites had greater bat activity in ‘innovatively’ logged forest than ‘traditionally’ logged and unlogged forest (data reported as statistical model results). One site had similar bat activity in ‘innovatively’ and ‘traditionally’ logged forest but lower bat activity in unlogged forest (data reported as statistical model results). Nine bat species were recorded in total (see original paper for data for individual species). In the ‘innovatively’ logged forest, trees were selectively retained (40–80 trees/ha) according to their shape, dominance, position and quality, and adjacent trees were cut to create openings. In the ‘traditionally’ logged forest, understorey trees were selectively thinned every 20–30 years and the canopy left intact. Unlogged forest had not been logged for >20 years. At each of three sites, three plots (3–6 ha) were surveyed for each of three treatments (‘innovatively’ logged, ‘traditionally’ logged, unlogged). Each plot was surveyed three times in June–September 2014 for two consecutive nights. Bat detectors recorded bat activity for 8 h from 30 minutes before sunset.

(Summarised by Anna Berthinussen)