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Individual study: Feed intake and digestion in the maned wolf (Chrysocyon brachyurus): consequences for dietary management

Published source details

Barboza P.S., Allen M.E., Rodden M. & Pojeta K. (1994) Feed intake and digestion in the maned wolf (Chrysocyon brachyurus): consequences for dietary management. Zoo Biology, 13, 375-381


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Carnivores: Feed commercially prepared diets Management of Captive Animals

A replicated, before-and-after study in 1990–1991 of maned wolves Chrysocyon brachyurus in a research facility in the USA found that when fed a diet containing commercial pellets, dry matter feed intake and digestibility were similar compared to a high meat and fruit-based diet despite a lower protein content. Dry matter intake was similar on the commercial diet compared to the high fruit and meat diet (584 vs 389 g per 30 kg of body mass per day) as was digestibility (73 vs 77%) whereas the metabolisable energy derived from protein was lower (28.6 vs 36.4%). Excess dietary protein is associated with the renal disorder cystinuria in maned wolves. Feed intake was monitored for three days in two individually housed wolves and one breeding pair housed together but fed separately, for the high meat and fruit diet and for two breeding pairs, where feed intake was combined, for the commercial diet. The high meat and fruit diet consisted of whole rats (575 g per 30 kg of body mass per day) fed in the morning and a mixed feed of frozen meat mix, bread, rice, oatmeal and fruit fed in the afternoon. For the commercial diet, rats were reduced (50 g) and the afternoon mixed feed consisted of frozen meat mix, rice and dry commercial pellets for dogs. Three other diets were also studied but without digestibility being measured. Faecal samples were collected daily and dried for analysis.