Study

Differential effects of dietary protein on early life-history and morphological traits in natterjack toad (Epidalea calamita) tadpoles reared in captivity

  • Published source details Martins F.M.S., Oom M.M., Rebelo R. & Rosa G.M. (2013) Differential effects of dietary protein on early life-history and morphological traits in natterjack toad (Epidalea calamita) tadpoles reared in captivity. Zoo Biology, 32, 457-462.

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Amphibians: Formulate larval diets to improve development or survival to adulthood

Action Link
Management of Captive Animals
  1. Amphibians: Formulate larval diets to improve development or survival to adulthood

    A randomized, replicated study in 2009-2013 in Portugal found that rearing natterjack toad Epidalea calamita tadpoles on a diet containing 46% protein had higher survival, increase in body weight over time, and body weights at onset of metamorphosis compared to diets containing less protein. Tadpoles fed the highest protein content diet had significantly greater survival (46% protein: 19 of 25; 38% protein: 10 of 25; 32% protein: 15 of 25), increase in body weight (46% protein: 677%; 38% protein: 564%; 32% protein: 461%), and body weight at metamorphosis (46% protein: 0.10g; 38% protein: 0.09g; 32% protein: 0.09g). Tadpoles on the high protein diet also had significantly longer bodies and shorter tail fins (mean values not reported). Metamorphs on the high protein diet had significantly longer bodies, wider heads and wider hind legs (mean values not reported). However, there was no significant difference in tadpole total length (mean values not reported) or metamorph body weight (46% protein: 0.08g; 38% protein: 0.07g; 32% protein: 0.07g). Individually housed tadpoles were randomly allocated to three groups of 25 each and fed commercial diets with 46%, 38% or 32% protein content. A randomized block design was used with one replicate of each dietary treatment within every block.

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