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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Sphagnum establishment on bare peat: the importance of climatic variability and Sphagnum species richness

Published source details

Chirino C., Campeau S. & Rochefort L. (2006) Sphagnum establishment on bare peat: the importance of climatic variability and Sphagnum species richness. Applied Vegetation Science, 9, 285-294


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Add mixed vegetation to peatland surface Peatland Conservation

A replicated, randomized, paired, before-and-after study in 1995–2001 in a historically mined bog in Quebec, Canada (Chirino et al. 2006) reported that plots sown with Sphagnum-dominated vegetation fragments (and rewetted and mulched) developed Sphagnum cover. Before sowing, plots were bare peat. After four growing seasons, Sphagnum cover was 23–48%. Plots sown with vegetation dominated by rusty bog moss Sphagnum fuscum had significantly greater Sphagnum cover (48%) than plots sown with vegetation dominated by three other single species (red bog moss Sphagnum rubellum 34%; fine bog moss Sphagnum angustifolium: 30%; Magellan’s bog moss Sphagnum magellanicum: 23%). Overall, there was no significant difference in Sphagnum cover between plots sown with single species (23–48%) or mixed species (32–40%). Each spring between 1995 and 1998, forty-five 30 m2 plots were established (in five blocks of nine) on bare rewetted peat. Within each block, four random plots were sown with vegetation dominated by a single Sphagnum species and five were sown with vegetation containing a mixture of 2–4 species. All plots were then mulched with straw. Sphagnum cover was visually estimated each autumn, for four years after sowing.

(Summarised by Nigel Taylor)