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Individual study: Can indicator species predict restoration outcomes early in the monitoring process? A case study with peatlands

Published source details

González E., Rochefort L., Boudreau S., Hugron S. & Poulin M. (2013) Can indicator species predict restoration outcomes early in the monitoring process? A case study with peatlands. Ecological Indicators, 32, 232-238


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Restore/create peatland vegetation using the moss layer transfer technique Peatland Conservation

A replicated study in 1997–2012 in 12 historically mined bogs in Canada (González et al. 2013) reported that most areas restored using the moss layer transfer technique developed a community of bog-characteristic plant species within 4–11 years. These results are not based on tests of statistical significance. Of 34 restored areas, 23 had developed a community of bog-characteristic plants (data reported as a graphical analysis). These areas were dominated by red bog moss Sphagnum rubellum (37% cover) and cottongrasses Eriophorum spp. (4–20% cover). Eleven areas did not develop this characteristic community. Eight were dominated by haircap moss Polytrichum strictum (60% cover). Three areas developed high cover of bare peat (52% cover), birch Betula sp. (12% cover) and lichens (4% cover). Between 1997 and 2004, 34 areas in 12 historically mined bogs were restored by levelling the peat surface, rewetting (blocking drainage ditches), adding Sphagnum-dominated vegetation fragments and mulching with straw. Some areas were also fertilized with phosphorous. Vegetation cover was estimated 4–11 years after intervention: vascular plants in 1 x 1 m quadrats (4–128/area) and bryophytes in 25 x 25 cm quadrats (20–640/area). This study included the site restored in (1), (3) and (4).

(Summarised by Nigel Taylor)