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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Peatland conversion and degradation processes in insular Southeast Asia: a case study in Jambi, Indonesia

Published source details

Miettinen J., Wang J., Hooijer A. & Liew S. (2013) Peatland conversion and degradation processes in insular Southeast Asia: a case study in Jambi, Indonesia. Land Degradation and Development, 24, 334-341


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Legally protect peatlands Peatland Conservation

A site comparison study in 1973–2009 in peat swamp forest in Indonesia (Miettinen et al. 2013) reported that a legally protected area retained more forest cover than an adjacent unprotected area. The results were not tested for statistical significance. In the 1970s, 99% of Berbak National Park was covered by peat swamp forest (and 95% by nearly pristine forest). By 2009, total peat swamp forest cover had declined to 77% (and nearly pristine cover to 73%). However, these declines were smaller than outside the National Park (total: from 91 to 46%; nearly pristine: from 86 to 25%). In 2009, there were also fewer industrial plantations and smallholder farms inside the National Park (0% cover) than outside (21% cover). Land cover was mapped using satellite images (10–60 m resolution) taken between 1973 and 2009. The images covered 1,262 km2 of Berbak National Park (protected as a game reserve since 1935 and a Ramsar site since 1992) and 2,128 km2 of adjacent land.

(Summarised by Nigel Taylor)