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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: The effect of dam construction on the restoration succession of spruce mires in the Giant Mountains (Czech Republic)

Published source details

Lanta V., Mach J. & Holcová V. (2006) The effect of dam construction on the restoration succession of spruce mires in the Giant Mountains (Czech Republic). Annales Botanici Fennici, 43, 260-268


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Rewet peatland (raise water table) Peatland Conservation

A replicated, paired, controlled study in 1997–2004 in a degraded raised bog in the Czech Republic (Lanta et al. 2006) found that rewetted plots developed different plant communities, but with similar species richness, to plots that remained drained. Over four years after rewetting, the overall plant community composition significantly differed between rewetted and drained plots (data reported as graphical analyses). Plant species with greater cover in rewetted than drained plots included Sphagnum mosses, white sedge Carex canescens, sheathed cottongrass Eriophorum vaginatum and marsh thistle Cirsium palustre. Forest-characteristic species had lower cover in rewetted than drained plots. Rewetting had no effect on plant species richness, which fluctuated similarly over time in rewetted plots (5–8 species/m2) and drained plots (4–6 species/m2). In 1997 and 2000, three drainage ditches were blocked with a total of 17 dams, rewetting the peat above. In rewetted plots, the water table was 7 cm below the peat surface on average (vs drained plots: 15 cm below). Over the following 1–4 years, cover of every plant species was visually estimated in 17 pairs of 1 m2 quadrats (one quadrat above and below each dam).

(Summarised by Nigel Taylor)