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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Succession of a degraded bog in NE Denmark over 164 years – monitoring one of the earliest restoration experiments

Published source details

Kollmann J. & Rasmussen K.K. (2012) Succession of a degraded bog in NE Denmark over 164 years – monitoring one of the earliest restoration experiments. Tuexenia, 32, 67-85


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Legally protect peatlands Peatland Conservation

A before-and-after study in 1844–2005 in a historically mined raised bog in Denmark (Kollmann & Rasmussen 2012) reported that following legal protection, the plant community changed over time in favour of woody species, whilst plants species richness fluctuated without trend. These results were not tested for statistical significance. Over 161 years of protection, the overall composition of the plant community changed (data reported as a graphical analysis). In particular, tree/shrub abundance increased (overall, and for 17 of 20 species). In 2005, the most common trees were downy birch Betula pubescens and common oak Quercus robur (both in 100% of monitored plots). The most common moss was Sphagnum fallax (in 14% of monitored cells). The number of vascular plant species in the bog fluctuated over time, with no clear trend (40 species before protection; 75 species after 41 years; 18 species after 127 years; 38 species after 161 years). In 1844, a mined bog was legally protected from further human use. Between 1844 and 2005, plant species were recorded in 18 permanent 113 m2 plots. In 2005, moss presence was recorded in six 0.25 m2 quadrats.

(Summarised by Nigel Taylor)