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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Effects of Long-Term Livestock Grazing on Fuel Characteristics in Rangelands: An Example From the Sagebrush Steppe

Published source details

Davies K.W., Bates J.D., Svejcar T.J. & Boyd C.S. (2010) Effects of Long-Term Livestock Grazing on Fuel Characteristics in Rangelands: An Example From the Sagebrush Steppe. Rangeland Ecology & Management, 63, 662-669


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Increase number of livestock Shrubland and Heathland Conservation

A randomized, replicated, paired, controlled study in 1936-2009 in eight sagebrush steppe sites in Oregon, USA (Davies et al. 2010) found that increasing the number of livestock decreased grass and herb cover, but did not significantly alter shrub cover. Grass and herb cover in grazed areas were lower (grass: 9%, herb: 17%) than in areas that were not grazed (grass: 18%, herb: 24%). However, shrub cover was not significantly different in grazed (16%) and ungrazed (16%) areas. Eight 2 ha fenced areas excluding livestock were established in 1936, and areas adjacent to the fenced areas were grazed by cattle from 1936-2008. Four 20 m transects were established in each study area and vegetation cover was assessed using a line intercept method.

(Summarised by Phil Martin)