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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Gorse (Ulex spp.) use by ponies in winter: Is the spatial pattern of browsing independent of the neighbouring vegetation?

Published source details

Aldezabal A., Mandaluniz N. & Laskurain N. (2013) Gorse (Ulex spp.) use by ponies in winter: Is the spatial pattern of browsing independent of the neighbouring vegetation? Grass and Forage Science, 68, 49-58


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Use grazing or alter livestock to control grass Shrubland and Heathland Conservation

A before-and-after study in winter 2006/2007 in a heathland in Northern Spain (Aldezabal et al. 2013) found that increasing the number of ponies present at the site reduced grass height in most cases. After one month and in nine of fifteen areas, grass was shorter in areas that were grazed (9-21 cm) than in the same areas prior to grazing (13–38 cm). In October 2006 fences were constructed around the site. Five Basque pottoka ponies were released at the site in December 2006, giving a density of 6.3 ponies/ha. Vegetation height was measured using a ruler in 120 quadrats before and after grazing (dates unspecified).

 

(Summarised by Phil Martin)

Increase number of livestock Shrubland and Heathland Conservation

A before-and-after stud y in winter 2006/2007 in a heathland in Northern Spain (Aldezabal et al. 2013) found that increasing the number of ponies present at the site reduced grass height in most cases. After one month and in nine of fifteen areas, grass was shorter in areas that were grazed (9‑21 cm) than in the same areas prior to grazing (13‑–38 cm). In October 2006 fences were constructed around the site. Five Basque pottoka ponies were released at the site in December 2006, giving a density of 6.3 ponies/ha. Vegetation height was measured using a ruler in 120 quadrats before and after grazing (dates unspecified).

(Summarised by Phil Martin)