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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Response of peat swamp forest species to macronutrients

Published source details

Yuwati T.W., Rachmanadi D., Santosa P.B., Rusmana . & Graham L.L.B. (2014) Response of peat swamp forest species to macronutrients. Pages 46-63 in: F.R.U. Banjarbu, . FORDA & L.L.B. Graham (eds.) Tropical Peat Swamp Forest Silviculture in Central Kalimantan. Kalimantan Forests and Climate Partnership, Indonesia.


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Add lime (before/after planting) Peatland Conservation

A replicated, randomized, controlled, before-and-after study in 2011 in a nursery in Indonesia (Yuwati et al. 2014) found that liming typically had no effect on growth of planted tree seedlings. Seedlings of 22 peat swamp tree species were studied. Limed and unlimed seedlings showed similar height growth for 15 species, similar growth of stem diameter for 14 species, and similar increase in dry mass for 19 species. The remaining species showed mixed responses: liming increased growth of some but reduced growth of others. In June 2011, 10 random seedlings of each species were limed (36.8 mg dolomitic lime twice/week) and 10 were not. Seedlings were grown in pots of soil and rice husk, from seed or transplanted from the wild. The duration of the experiment was not reported.

(Summarised by Nigel Taylor)

Add inorganic fertilizer (before/after planting) Peatland Conservation

A replicated, randomized, controlled, before-and-after study in 2011 in a nursery in Indonesia (Yuwati et al. 2014) found that fertilization typically had no effect on growth of planted tree seedlings. Seedlings of 22 peat swamp tree species were studied. For 14–22 species (depending on the chemicals in the fertilizer), fertilized and unfertilized seedlings showed similar height growth. Similarly, fertilization had no significant effect on stem diameter of 16–18 species and dry mass of 19–20 species. The remaining species showed mixed responses: fertilization increased growth of some but reduced growth of others. In June 2011, 10 random seedlings of each species received each fertilizer treatment (36.8 mg of each nutrient twice/week): N, N+P, N+P+K or none. Seedlings were grown in pots of soil and rice husk, from seed or transplanted from the wild. The duration of the experiment was not reported.

(Summarised by Nigel Taylor)