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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Regeneration and restoration of degraded peat swamp forest in Berbak NP, Jambi, Sumatra, Indonesia

Published source details

van Eijk P., Leenman P., Wibisono I.T.C. & Giesen W. (2010) Regeneration and restoration of degraded peat swamp forest in Berbak NP, Jambi, Sumatra, Indonesia. Malayan Nature Journal, 61, 223-241


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Directly plant peatland trees/shrubs Peatland Conservation

A study in 2003–2004 in a fire-damaged peat swamp forest in Indonesia (van Eijk et al. 2010) reported that most planted tree seedlings survived over three months, but most had died after five months following flooding. Nine species of peat swamp trees were planted. After three months, 65–85% of seedlings had survived. However, after five months <5% of seedlings remained alive following unusually deep flooding. At this point, survival was highest for myrtle Eugenia sp. (27%) and red lauan Shorea pauciflora (13%). No Palaquium sp., Gluta wallichii or Dryera polyphylla seedlings survived the deep flooding. In November and December 2003, fourteen thousand tree seedlings were planted into individual mounds (30–50 cm tall) within a burned peat swamp. Most seedlings (94%) were Gonystylus bancanus, Palaquium sp., Gluta wallichii and Shorea pacuiflora. Survival was monitored in February and, for 10% of the planted mounds, in April 2004.

(Summarised by Nigel Taylor)