Conservation Evidence strives to be as useful to conservationists as possible. Please take our survey to help the team improve our resource.

Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Assessment of an integrated peat-harvesting and reclamation method: peatland-atmosphere carbon fluxes and vegetation recovery

Published source details

Wilhelm L.P., Morris P.J., Granath G. & Waddington J.M. (2015) Assessment of an integrated peat-harvesting and reclamation method: peatland-atmosphere carbon fluxes and vegetation recovery. Wetlands Ecology and Management, 23, 491-504


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Replace blocks of vegetation after mining or peat extraction Peatland Conservation

A site comparison study in 2008–2009 in a fen in Ontario, Canada (Wilhelm et al. 2015) reported that plots where surface peat was replaced developed plant cover and community composition intermediate between hummocks and hollows of an undisturbed plot. These results were not tested for statistical significance. After one year, Sphagnum moss cover was higher in peat-replacement plots (22–35%) than in undisturbed hollows (8–19%), but lower than on undisturbed hummocks (100%). The same was true for shrubs (peat-replacement: 15–20%; undisturbed hollows: 10%; undisturbed hummocks: 50%). For peat-replacement plots, data were not provided separately for hollows and hummocks. Overall community data were reported as a graphical analysis. In April 2008, 30-cm-thick blocks of peat and vegetation were replaced on a 12 x 12 m plot after removal of the underlying peat. An undisturbed plot 80 m away provided a comparison. From May to July 2009, vegetation cover was estimated in 6–18 quadrats/plot, distributed evenly across hummocks and hollows.

(Summarised by Nigel Taylor)