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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Effects of grassland management using prescribed burning on habitat occupancy and conservation of birds in a mosaic landscape at Railleu, Languedoc-Roussillon, France

Published source details

Pons P., Lambert B., Rigolot E. & Prodon R. (2003) The effects of grassland management using fire on habitat occupancy and conservation of birds at a mosaic landscape. Biodiversity and Conservation, 12, 1843-1860


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Employ grazing in natural grasslands Bird Conservation

A site comparison study in the Pyrénées-Orientales, France, in 1998-1999 (Pons et al. 2003), found that four bird species with an unfavourable conservation status in Europe preferentially used burned hillsides, compared with unmanaged or grazed areas. This study is discussed in detail in ‘Use prescribed burning’.

 

Use prescribed burning on grasslands Bird Conservation

A replicated study in June 1998-1999 in grassland and shrubland on a subalpine hillside in the Pyrénées-Orientales, France (Pons et al. 2003) found that four bird species with an unfavourable conservation status in Europe (rock bunting Emberiza cia, woodlark Lullula arborea, stonechat Saxicola torquata and red-backed shrike Lanius collurio) were found at highest abundances on recently burned grassland with scattered shrubs. A wildfire burned about one half of the hillside in 1980. From 1990 onwards, grassland management comprised prescribed winter burns (on a one-to-seven year rotation) and summer cattle grazing.