Conservation Evidence strives to be as useful to conservationists as possible. Please take our survey to help the team improve our resource.

Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Restoration ecology: aiding and abetting secondary succession on abandoned peat mines in Nova Scotia and New Brunswick, Canada

Published source details

Vander Kloet S.P., Avery T.S., Vander Kloet P.J. & Milton G.R. (2012) Restoration ecology: aiding and abetting secondary succession on abandoned peat mines in Nova Scotia and New Brunswick, Canada. Mires and Peat, 10, Article-9


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Directly plant peatland trees/shrubs Peatland Conservation

A replicated before-and-after study in 2004–2008 three historically mined bogs in eastern Canada (Vander Kloet et al. 2012) reported that 63–100% of planted shrub clumps survived over four years, and that survivors had grown in diameter. Survival of bog cranberry Vaccinium oxycoccos was 100%, crowberry Empetrum spp. 83%, lingonberry Vaccinium vitis-ideae 71%, and mixed-species clumps (mostly Vaccinium berry species) 63%. Approximately 96% of surviving clumps showed positive growth (data not reported for single species). Amongst these, diameter increased by 50 cm/year for bog cranberry, 8 cm/year for crowberry, 22 cm/year for lingonberry and 7–8 cm/year for mixed clumps. Additionally, across all studied species, bigger clumps were more likely to survive (see original paper). In 2004, 916 clumps of shrub seedlings were planted, 1–2 m apart, along transects on wet peat. Initial clump diameter was recorded. Seedlings had been grown in a greenhouse from seeds in berries or scat fragments. In 2008, survival and final clump diameter were measured.

(Summarised by Nigel Taylor)