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Individual study: Mechanisms involved in the re-establishment of Sphagnum-dominated vegetation in rewetted bog remnants

Published source details

Smolders A.J.P., Tomassen H.B.M., van Mullekom L.P.M. & Roelofs J.G.M. (2003) Mechanisms involved in the re-establishment of Sphagnum-dominated vegetation in rewetted bog remnants. Wetlands Ecology and Management, 11, 403-418


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Directly plant peatland mosses Peatland Conservation

A replicated before-and-after study in 1998–2001 in a bog in Ireland (Smolders et al. 2003) reported that transplanted sods of Sphagnum moss grew in bare or moss-covered peat. No statistical tests were carried out. Two years after transplantation to a soaked bare peat surface, sods of transplanted Sphagnum sods covered 1,350–1,400 cm2 (compared to 480–510 cm2 when planted). Similarly, two years after transplantation into established feathery bog moss Sphagnum cuspidatum, transplanted Sphagnum sods covered 1,290–1,710 cm2 (compared to 350–510 cm2 when planted). In 1998 or 1999, sods of Magellanic bog moss Sphagnum magellanicum and papillose bog moss Sphagnum papillosum were cut from existing bogs. Three sods of each species, approximately 500 cm2 and 10 cm deep, were transplanted to depressions: bare or covered with feathery bog moss. Sod surface areas were measured annually.

(Summarised by Nigel Taylor)