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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Performance of artificial maternity bat roost structures near Bath, UK

Published source details

Garland L., Wells M. & Markham S. (2017) Performance of artificial maternity bat roost structures near Bath, UK. Conservation Evidence, 14, 44-51


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Create alternative bat roosts within developments Bat Conservation

A before-and-after study in 2010–2017 of one residential building development in the Cotswold Hills, UK (Garland et al 2017) found that a purpose-built bat house was used by a brown long eared bat Plecotus auritus maternity colony after the original roost in a farmhouse loft was demolished. In 2010 (the year before demolition), the original roost was used by 8–12 bats. In 2013 (two years after construction), 20–22 bats were recorded in the new bat house, although no juveniles were counted, and numbers were lower in 2014–2017 (range 1–11 bats). Small numbers of common pipistrelle bats Pipistrellus pipistrellus were also observed using roost features on the bat house (data not reported). The bat house was constructed in an ‘L-shape’ 30 m from the original roost and included features such as bat tiles, ridge beam access points, wall-integrated bat boxes (Schwegler design 2FR), hanging tiles, and wall mounted climber planting. The original roost was demolished in late winter 2010 and the bat house was completed in early spring 2011. Surveys were carried out every year in 2010–2017 including daytime inspections and evening emergence counts on 1–3 separate occasions/year.

(Summarised by Berthinussen)

Create alternative bat roosts within developments Bat Conservation

A before-and-after study in 2010–2017 of one residential building development in the Cotswold Hills, UK (Garland et al 2017) found that a purpose-built bat wall was not used by a common pipistrelle Pipistrellus pipistrellus maternity colony six years after the original roost in a stone cottage wall was demolished. In 2010 (the year before demolition), the original roost was used by >76 bats. During the six years after construction, the new bat wall was used by low numbers of individual bats (0–3 bats/year) and was not used as a maternity roost. The bat wall was constructed on the east-facing gable wall of an existing hay barn 30 m from the original roost. It included multiple stone crevices leading to internal cavities and five wall-integrated bat boxes (Schwegler design 1FR). The original roost was demolished in late winter 2010 and the bat wall was completed in early spring 2011. Surveys were carried out every year in 2010–2017 including daytime inspections and evening emergence counts on 1–3 separate occasions/year.