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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Revegetation dynamics after 15 years of rewetting in two extracted peatlands in Sweden

Published source details

Kozlov S.A., Lundin L. & Avetov N.A. (2016) Revegetation dynamics after 15 years of rewetting in two extracted peatlands in Sweden. Mires and Peat, 18, Article-5


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Rewet peatland (raise water table) Peatland Conservation

A replicated before-and-after study in 1999–2014 in two historically mined bogs in Sweden (Kozlov et al. 2016) reported that rewetted bogs developed plant communities that included some key bog species. Before rewetting, both bogs were bare peat. In Västkärr bog, vegetation developed within one year after rewetting. The overall plant community composition changed significantly over the 14 measured years (data reported as a graphical analysis). During this period, there were 2–6 plant species/m2 and vegetation cover was 30–112%. After 14 years, vegetation cover included sedges Carex spp. (23%), duckweed Lemna minor (15%), cattail Typha latifolia (10%) and common reed Phragmites australis (1%). In Porla bog, vegetation cover developed 7–14 years after rewetting. During this period, the overall plant community composition did not change significantly (data reported as a graphical analysis). There were 2–4 plant species/m2 and vegetation cover was 40–77%. After 14 years, vegetation cover included Eriophorum spp. (13–32%), Sphagnum mosses (20%), other mosses (<1%), sedges (2%) and common reed (2%). In 1999, both drained bogs were cleared of existing vegetation then rewetted (Västkärr by filling ditches and ceasing pumping, Porla by restoring inflow). Between 2000 and 2014, cover of every plant species was estimated in 1 m2 quadrats: 1–32 quadrats/year/bog. The water table in the sampled areas was 0–20 cm above the peat surface.

(Summarised by Nigel Taylor)