Study

Shorea balangeran and Dyera polyphylla (syn. Dyera lowii) as tropical peat swamp forest restoration transplant species: effects of mycorrhizae and level of disturbance

  • Published source details Graham L.L.B., Turjaman M. & Page S.E. (2013) Shorea balangeran and Dyera polyphylla (syn. Dyera lowii) as tropical peat swamp forest restoration transplant species: effects of mycorrhizae and level of disturbance. Wetlands Ecology and Management, 21, 307-321

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Add root-associated fungi to plants (before planting)

Action Link
Peatland Conservation

Directly plant peatland trees/shrubs

Action Link
Peatland Conservation
  1. Add root-associated fungi to plants (before planting)

    A replicated, paired, controlled, before-and-after study in 2007–2009 in a peat swamp forest in Indonesia (Graham et al. 2013) found that inoculation with root fungi had no effect on survival or growth of two planted tree species: red balau Shorea balangeran and jelutong Dyera polyphylla. One year after planting, seedlings with and without added root fungi had similar survival (75–91%; data not reported separately for forest types), similar height increase (in five of five forest types; with fungi: 2–11 cm; without fungi: 3–10 cm) and similar diameter increase (in five of five forest types; with fungi: 0.6–2.7 mm; without fungi: 0.7–2.4 mm). In 2007 or 2008, nursery-reared seedlings (800 red balau and 700 jelutong) were planted in five forest types from natural/closed forest to degraded/open land. Approximately two thirds of these seedlings had been inoculated with fungi by adding spore tablets to the soil in the nursery. The other seedlings were not inoculated. After one year, seedling survival and growth were measured.

  2. Directly plant peatland trees/shrubs

    A replicated before-and-after study in 2007–2009 in a peat swamp in Indonesia (Graham et al. 2013) reported that 75–91% of planted red balau Shorea balangeran and jelutong Dyera polyphylla survived over one year, and that  surviving trees had grown. Survival was not reported separately for the two planted species. After one year, planted seedlings of both species had increased in height (red balau by 4–11 cm; jelutong: by 2–4 cm) and diameter (both species by 0.6–2.7 mm). Amongst planted seedlings, growth (but not survival) differed between forest types. Seedlings grew significantly taller and thinner in closed forest vs open forest (see original paper). Inoculation with fungi had no significant effect on survival or growth (see intervention Add root-associated fungi before planting). In 2007 or 2008, nursery-reared seedlings (800 red balau and 700 jelutong) were planted in five forest types from natural/closed forest to degraded/open land. Between half and two-thirds of the seedlings had been inoculated with root fungi. After one year, all seedlings’ survival and growth were measured.

Output references

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