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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Artificial bird perches for the regeneration of degraded tropical peat swamp forest: a restoration tool with limited potential

Published source details

Graham L.L.B. & Page S.E. (2011) Artificial bird perches for the regeneration of degraded tropical peat swamp forest: a restoration tool with limited potential. Restoration Ecology, 20, 631-637


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Build artificial bird perches to encourage seed dispersal Peatland Conservation

A replicated, paired, controlled study in 2007–2008 in a degraded, burned, peat swamp forest in Kalimantan, Indonesia (Graham et al. 2011) found that installing artificial bird perches along a forest edge had no effect on tree seedling abundance. After one year, seedling density was not significantly different under artificial perches (2–6 seedlings/m2) and in adjacent plots not under perches (1–2 seedlings/m2). Most seedlings under the perches were tampohot Syzygium sp. (79% of all seedlings). In July 2007, ten 8 m tall artificial bird perches were erected in logged and burned peatland, 50 to 200 m from the edge of a remnant forest patch. Two 1 m2 plots were monitored for each perch: one directly underneath the perch and one next to it. All seedlings initially present were marked. In July 2008, new tree seedlings were counted.

(Summarised by Nigel Taylor)