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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Do testate amoebae communities recover in concordance with vegetation after restoration of drained peatlands?

Published source details

Daza Secco E., Haapalehto T., Haimi J., Meissner K. & Tahvanainen T. (2016) Do testate amoebae communities recover in concordance with vegetation after restoration of drained peatlands? Mires and Peat, 18, Article-12


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Cut/remove/thin forest plantations and rewet peat Peatland Conservation

A replicated site comparison study in 2007 in 19 forested fens in Finland (Daza Secco et al. 2016) found that restoration by tree thinning and rewetting had no effect on plant taxon richness, diversity or community composition. After 3–12 years, there were no significant differences between treatments for plant taxon richness (restored: 11–12; degraded: 11; natural: 12 taxa/m2) or diversity (data reported as a diversity index). Overall plant community composition did not differ between restored and degraded sites, but was significantly different from natural sites in both (data reported as a graphical analysis). Of the 19 studied forested fens, 10 had been restored 3–12 years before sampling (trees thinned and drainage ditches filled; water table 16 cm below peat surface). Four fens were degraded (with excess tree growth and drained; water table 32 cm below surface). Five fens were natural (sparsely forested and undrained; water table 19 cm below surface). In summer 2007, cover of plant taxa was estimated in three 1 m2 plots at each site.

(Summarised by Nigel Taylor)