Study

Field experiment of Sphagnum reintroduction on a dry abandoned peatland in eastern Canada

  • Published source details Bugnon J.-L., Rochefort L. & Price J.S. (1997) Field experiment of Sphagnum reintroduction on a dry abandoned peatland in eastern Canada. Wetlands, 17, 513-517

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Reprofile/relandscape peatland (before planting)

Action Link
Peatland Conservation

Add mixed vegetation to peatland surface

Action Link
Peatland Conservation
  1. Reprofile/relandscape peatland (before planting)

    A replicated, paired, controlled, before-and-after study in 1995 in a historically mined raised bog in Quebec, Canada (Bugnon et al. 1997) found that reprofiling plots into depressions, before sowing Sphagnum-dominated vegetation fragments, increased the number of Sphagnum moss shoots present. After one growing season, reprofiled plots contained more Sphagnum shoots (469–629/m2) than raised plots (146/m2). Amongst reprofiled plots, those with slopes covered in plastic sheeting contained more Sphagnum shoots (629/m2) than those without sheeting (469/m2). In May 1995, nine 8 m2 plots (three blocks of three) were established on bare rewetted peat. Six plots (two plots/block) were situated at the base of excavated slopes (i.e. in the point of a 1 m deep “V”). Three plots (one plot/block) were on raised peat. Additionally, the reprofiled slopes above three plots were covered with plastic sheets. All plots were sown with vegetation fragments (mostly seven mixed Sphagnum species), freshly collected from the surface of nearby bogs, then mulched with straw. In October 1995, Sphagnum shoots were counted in 240 quadrats/plot, each 400 cm2 and placed systematically.

    (Summarised by: Nigel Taylor)

  2. Add mixed vegetation to peatland surface

    A replicated before-and-after study in 1995 in a historically mined raised bog in Quebec, Canada (Bugnon et al. 1997) reported that plots sown with Sphagnum-dominated vegetation fragments (and mulched) developed Sphagnum moss cover. Before sowing, plots were bare rewetted peat. After one growing season, there were 146–629 Sphagnum shoots/m2. Additionally, shoot density was significantly higher in plots reprofiled into depressions before sowing (with plastic sheeting: 629 shoots/m2; without plastic sheeting: 469 shoots/m2) than in plots that remained at surface level (146 shoots/m2). In May 1995, three blocks of three 8 m2 plots were established on bare rewetted peat. Plots were sown with vegetation fragments (mostly seven mixed Sphagnum moss species) freshly collected from the surface of nearby bogs. In each block, one plot was flat and two were reprofiled to be lower in the centre. The slopes of one reprofiled plot/block were covered with plastic sheets. All plots were mulched with straw after sowing. In October 1995, Sphagnum shoots were counted in 240 quadrats/plot, each 400 cm2 and placed systematically.

    (Summarised by: Nigel Taylor)

Output references

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