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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Assessment of post-burn removal methods for Acacia saligna in Cape Flats Sand Fynbos, with consideration of indigenous plant recovery

Published source details

Krupek A, Gaertner M., Holmes P.M. & Elser K.J. (2016) Assessment of post-burn removal methods for Acacia saligna in Cape Flats Sand Fynbos, with consideration of indigenous plant recovery. South African Journal of Botany, 105, 211-217


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Cut trees and remove tree seedlings Shrubland and Heathland Conservation

A controlled, before-and-after study in 2013-2014 in a fynbos site in Cape Town, South Africa (Krupek et al. 2016) found that cutting of invasive orange wattle Acacia saligna trees, followed by removal of the species’ seedlings increased plant diversity and shrub cover. Plant species diversity was higher in areas where orange wattle trees were cut and had seedlings removed than areas where no cutting or seedling removal had been carried out (data as model results). Cutting and removal of seedlings also led to higher shrub cover (10% cover) compared to areas that had not been cut or had seedlings removed (5% cover). In April 2013 orange wattle saplings were cut using loppers and seedlings removed by hand in ten 25 m2 plots, while another 10 plots were left uncut. The cover of plant species was assessed using 1 m2 quadrats placed inside each plot.

(Summarised by Phil Martin)

Apply herbicide to trees Shrubland and Heathland Conservation

A replicated, controlled, before-and-after study in 2013–2014 in a fynbos site in Cape Town, South Africa (Krupek et al. 2016) found that spraying invasive orange wattle Acacia saligna trees with herbicide increased plant diversity, but not shrub cover. Plant species diversity was higher in areas treated with herbicide than in untreated areas (data presented as model results). However, shrub cover in areas treated with herbicide (2%) did not differ from untreated areas (5%). In April 2013 herbicide was sprayed on orange wattle saplings in ten 25 m2 plots, while another ten plots were left untreated. The cover and diversity of plant species was assessed using 1 m2 quadrats placed inside each plot.

(Summarised by Phil Martin)

Cut trees and apply herbicide Shrubland and Heathland Conservation

A controlled, before-and-after trial between 2013 and 2014 in a fynbos site in Cape Town, South Africa (Krupek et al. 2016) found that cutting of invasive orange wattle Acacia saligna trees, followed by herbicide treatment, increased plant diversity, but not shrub cover. Plant species diversity was higher in areas that had been cut and had herbicide applied than areas where no cutting or herbicide application had been carried out (data as model results). However, shrub cover in areas that had been cut and had herbicide applied (4%) was not significantly different from areas that had not been cut or had herbicide applied (5%). In April 2013 in ten 25 m2 plots the orange wattle saplings were cut and herbicide (active ingredients Triclopyr 120 g/l and Aminopyralid 12 g/l) was applied to their cut stems, while another ten plots were left uncut. The cover of plant species was assessed using 1 m2 quadrats placed inside each plot.

(Summarised by Phil Martin)