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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Tradeoffs in the Rehabilitation of a Succulent Karoo Rangeland

Published source details

Hanke W., Wesuls D., Münchberger W. & Schmiedel U (2015) Tradeoffs in the Rehabilitation of a Succulent Karoo Rangeland. Land Degradation and Development, 26, 833-842


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Add manure to soil Shrubland and Heathland Conservation

A replicated, randomized, controlled study between 2007 and 2011 in a karoo shrubland in Richtersveld, South Africa (Hanke et al. 2015) found that adding manure to increase colonisation increased plant cover and the number of plant species. After three years, plant cover of areas where manure was added (7%) was higher than that in areas where manure was not added (4%). Similarly, the number of plant species in areas where manure was added (11 species) was higher than in areas where manure was not added (7 species). Five 1 ha blocks were divided using a fence to exclude cattle. In each block goat and sheep manure was spread in one 10 m x 10 m plot while another plot was left without manure addition. Vegetation in each 10 m x 10 m plot was assessed annually between 2008 and 2011.

(Summarised by Phil Martin)

Plant individual plants Shrubland and Heathland Conservation

A replicated, randomized, controlled study between 2007 and 2011 in a karoo shrubland in Richtersveld, South Africa (Hanke et al 2015) found that planting of Brownanthus pseudoschlichtianus plants increased plant cover but not the number of plant species. After three years, the plant cover of areas where B. pseudoschlichtianus plants were planted (8%) was higher than that in areas where there was no planting (4%). The number of plant species in areas where B. pseudoschlichtianus plants were planted (8 species) was not significantly different from areas where shrubland plants were not planted (7 species). Five 1 ha blocks were divided using a fence to exclude cattle. In each block B. pseudoschlichtianus one 10 m x 10 m plot while another plot was left without addition of plants. Vegetation in each 10 m x 10 m plot was assessed annually between 2008 and 2011.

(Summarised by Phil Martin)

Spread clippings Shrubland and Heathland Conservation

A replicated, randomized, controlled study between 2007 and 2011 in a karoo shrubland in Richtersveld, South Africa (4) found that spreading branches of the shrub Brownanthus pseudoschlichtianus on overgrazed plots did not increase plant cover or the number of plant species. After three years, plant cover of areas where shrub branches were spread (3%) did not differ significantly from areas where branches were not spread (4%). Similarly, the number of plant species in areas where shrub branches were spread (6 species) did not differ significantly from areas where branches were not spread (7 species). Five 1 ha blocks were divided using a fence to exclude cattle. In each block branches from B. pseudoschlichtianus were spread in one 10 m x 10 m plot while another plot was left with no branches spread. Vegetation in each 10 m x 10 m plot was assessed annually between 2008 and 2011.

(Summarised by Phil Martin)