Conservation Evidence strives to be as useful to conservationists as possible. Please take our survey to help the team improve our resource.

Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Successful return of a wild infant chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes verus) to its natal group after capture by poachers

Published source details

Pruetz J.D. & Kante D. (2010) Successful return of a wild infant chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes verus) to its natal group after capture by poachers. African Primates, 7, 35-41


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Wear face-masks to avoid transmission of viral and bacterial diseases to primates Primate Conservation

A study in 2009 in savanna-woodland mosaic in Niokolo-Koba National Park, Senegal found that a confiscated 9-months old female infant chimpanzee Pan troglodytes verus that was handled by caretakers wearing face-masks along with other interventions, was reunited with its mother in the wild. Four days after confiscation, the chimpanzee was released in the vicinity of its natal group, which retrieved it immediately. The author wore a surgical mask and sanitized her hands when handling the infant and its food to prevent disease transmission. The infant’s natal group was located with the aid of poachers, after which it was released close to the group. The infant was also treated for its injured eye. The study does not distinguish between the effects of the different interventions mentioned above.

Reintroduce primates as single/multiple individuals Primate Conservation

A study in 2009 in savanna in Senegal found that a confiscated 9-month old female infant chimpanzee Pan troglodytes verus that was reintroduced, along with other interventions, was reunited with its mother in the wild. Four days after confiscation, the chimpanzee was released close to its natal group, which retrieved it immediately. Researchers wore surgical masks and sanitized their hands when handling the infant and its food. The infant’s natal group was located with the aid of poachers, after which the infant was released close to the group. The infant was also treated for its injured eye. The study does not distinguish between the effects of the different interventions mentioned above.

Treat sick/injured animals Primate Conservation

A study in 2009 in savanna-woodland mosaic in Niokolo-Koba National Park, Senegal found that a confiscated female infant chimpanzee Pan troglodytes verus that was treated for injuries along with other interventions, was reunited with its mother in the wild. Four days after confiscation, the chimpanzee was released in the vicinity of its natal group, which retrieved it immediately. The estimated 9-months old female infant chimpanzee was treated for its injured eye which was almost completely healed before release. The infant’s natal group was located with the aid of poachers, after which the infant was released close to the group. The researcher wore a surgical mask and sanitized her hands when handling the infant and its food to prevent disease transmission. The study does not distinguish between the effects of the different interventions mentioned above.

Reintroduce primates into habitat where the species is present Primate Conservation

A study in 2009 in savanna in Senegal found that reintroducing into the wild of a confiscated 9-month old female infant chimpanzee Pan troglodytes verus resulted in succesul reunion with its mother in habitat where other resident wild chimpanzees occurred. Reintroduction was carried alongside other interventions. Four days after confiscation, the chimpanzee was released in the vicinity of its natal group, which retrieved it immediately. The infant’s natal group was located and the infant was released close to the group. The infant was also treated for its injured eye. During handling of the infant surgical masks were worn and hands were sanitized when handling the infant and its food. The study does not distinguish between the effects of the different interventions mentioned above.