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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Changes in vegetation following reduction in grazing pressure on the National Trust's Kinder Estate, Peak District, Derbyshire, England

Published source details

Anderson P. & Radford E. (1994) Changes in vegetation following reduction in grazing pressure on the National Trust's Kinder Estate, Peak District, Derbyshire, England. Biological Conservation, 69, 55-63


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Reduce number of livestock Shrubland and Heathland Conservation

A before-and-after trial in 1983–1990 at a moorland site in the UK (Anderson & Radford 1994) found that reducing sheep density increased the abundance of shrub and grass species. Cover was higher seven years after sheep removal for the shrubs common heather Calluna vulgaris (16%) and bilberry Vaccinium myrtillus (14%) than before removal (heather: 0%; bilberry: 1%). Cover and biomass of wavy-hair grass Deschampsia flexuosa were also higher seven years after sheep removal (cover: 83%; biomass: 56 g/plot) than before sheep removal (cover: 41%; biomass: 9 g/plot). Between 1982 and 1990 sheep numbers were reduced from 2.5 ewes/ha to 0.3 ewes/ha (with some fluctuations between). Vegetation cover was measured each spring at 1 m intervals along 10 permanent transects per plot.

(Summarised by Phil Martin)