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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Establishment and Management of Native Functional Groups in Restoration

Published source details

Kimball S., Lulow M.E., Mooney K.A. & Sorenson Q.M. (2014) Establishment and Management of Native Functional Groups in Restoration. Restoration Ecology, 22, 81-88


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Sow seeds Shrubland and Heathland Conservation

A controlled study in 2010–2011 in sagebrush scrub invaded by non-native grasses in California, USA (Kimball et al. 2014) found that sowing seeds by hand resulted in a higher density of shrub seedlings and plant species indicative of disturbance than using a seed drill. In two of two trials the densities of shrub seedlings were higher where seeds had been sown by hand (11–17 seedlings/quadrat) than where they were sown using a seed drill (3–5 seedlings/quadrat). In one of two trials the densities of seedlings of plant species indicative of disturbance were higher where seeds had been sown by hand (6 seedlings/quadrat) than where they had been sown using a seed drill (3 seedlings/quadrat). In December 2010 nine 18.5 m2 plots were sown with native seeds by hand, and in another nine plots seeds were sown using a seed drill. Seedling density was measured in June 2011 in 25 cm x 25 cm quadrats placed in each plot.

(Summarised by Phil Martin)