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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Exotic Grass Competition in Suppressing Native Shrubland Re-establishment

Published source details

Eliason S.A. & Allen E.B. (1997) Exotic Grass Competition in Suppressing Native Shrubland Re-establishment. Restoration Ecology, 5, 245-255


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Cut/mow to control grass and sow seed of shrubland plants Shrubland and Heathland Conservation

A randomized, replicated, controlled study in 1993–1994 in sagebrush scrub habitat invaded by non-native grasses in California, USA (Eliason & Allen 1997) found that in areas where invasive grasses were cut and seeds of shrubs were sown, the biomass of sagebrush Artemisia californica plants did not differ from areas where invasive grasses were not cut but seeds were sown. In areas where invasive grasses were cut and shrub seeds were sown the biomass of sagebrush individuals (141 g) was not significantly different to those in areas where only shrub seeds were sown (50–119 g). In March 1993 invasive grasses were removed in three 1 m x 1.2 m plots after which sagebrush seeds were sown, while in 12 plots grasses were not removed and seeds were sown. Sagebrush plants were harvested in May-June 1994.

(Summarised by Phil Martin)