Study

Herbicide trials for the control of parrotsfeather

  • Published source details Hofstra D.E., Champion P. & Dugdale T. (2006) Herbicide trials for the control of parrotsfeather. Journal of Aquatic Plant Management, 44, 13-18

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Parrot’s feather: Use of herbicides - endohall

Action Link
Control of Freshwater Invasive Species

Parrot’s feather: Use of herbicides - triclopyr

Action Link
Control of Freshwater Invasive Species

Parrot’s feather: Use of herbicides - triclopyr

Action Link
Control of Freshwater Invasive Species

Parrot’s feather: Use of herbicides - endohall

Action Link
Control of Freshwater Invasive Species

Parrot’s feather: Use of herbicides - triclopyr

Action Link
Control of Freshwater Invasive Species

Parrot’s feather: Use of herbicides - triclopyr

Action Link
Control of Freshwater Invasive Species

Parrot’s feather: Use of herbicides - other herbicides

Action Link
Control of Freshwater Invasive Species

Parrot’s feather: Use of herbicides - other herbicides

Action Link
Control of Freshwater Invasive Species

Parrot’s feather: Use of herbicides - other herbicides

Action Link
Control of Freshwater Invasive Species

Parrot’s feather: Use of herbicides - other herbicides

Action Link
Control of Freshwater Invasive Species
  1. Parrot’s feather: Use of herbicides - endohall

    A small, replicated, controlled, laboratory study conducted between 1999 and 2000 in New Zealand (Hofstra et al. 2006) found that the herbicide endothall reduced the growth of parrot’s feather Myriophyllum aquaticum. After 17 weeks, plants treated with endothall had a lower dry weight (29–57 g) than that of untreated plants (274 g). Plants were grown for approximately two months prior to herbicide application in 60 l plastic tubs. Endothall was sprayed onto plants in three tubs at a concentration of 9 and 15 kg/ha and plants in four tubs were left untreated.

  2. Parrot’s feather: Use of herbicides - triclopyr

    A small, replicated, controlled, laboratory study conducted between 1999 and 2000 in New Zealand (Hofstra et al. 2006) found that the herbicide triclopyr reduced the growth of parrot’s feather Myriophyllum aquaticum. After 17 weeks, plants treated with triclopyr had a lower dry weight (1–2 g) than that of untreated plants (274 g). Plants were grown for approximately two months prior to herbicide application in 60 l plastic tubs. Triclopyr was sprayed onto plants in three tubs at a concentration of 2 and 4 kg/ha and plants in four tubs were left untreated.

  3. Parrot’s feather: Use of herbicides - triclopyr

    A replicated, controlled field study conducted between 2001 and 2002 in a wetland in the Northern Island of New Zealand (Hofstra et al. 2006) reported treatment with the herbicide triclopyr reduced vegetation cover of parrot’s feather Myriophyllum aquaticum plants soon after application, but after 28 weeks cover was similar to pre-treatment levels. Results were not subject to statistical tests. After 10 weeks and following a second herbicide application, vegetation cover of treated plants was lower (1.5%) than of untreated plants (47%). However, after 28 weeks, vegetation cover of treated plants (68–84%) was similar to that of untreated plants (97%). Authors reported that the increase in vegetation cover resulted from the encroachment of plants from outside sprayed areas rather than due to regrowth in treated plots. Triclopyr was applied at concentrations of 2 and 4 kg/ha. Each herbicide concentration was sprayed into three 5 x 5 m plots and three plots were left untreated. Herbicides were applied in early summer (December). A second application took place 51 days after the initial treatment.

  4. Parrot’s feather: Use of herbicides - endohall

    A replicated, controlled field study conducted between 2001 and 2002 in a wetland in the Northern Island of New Zealand (Hofstra et al. 2006) reported that treatment with the herbicide endothall reduced vegetation cover of parrot’s feather Myriophyllum aquaticum plants soon after application, but after 28 weeks cover was similar to pre-treatment levels. Results were not subject to statistical tests. After 10 weeks and following a second herbicide application, vegetation cover of treated plants was lower (2%) than untreated plants (47%). However, after 28 weeks, vegetation cover of treated plants (93%) was similar to that of untreated plants (97%). Authors reported that the increase in vegetation cover resulted from the encroachment of plants from outside sprayed areas rather than due to regrowth in treated plots. Endothall was applied at concentrations of 8.8 and 14.8 kg/ha. Each herbicide concentration was sprayed into three 5 x 5 m plots and three plots were left untreated. Herbicides were applied in early summer (December). A second application took place 51 days after the initial treatment.

  5. Parrot’s feather: Use of herbicides - triclopyr

    A replicated, before-and-after field study conducted between 2002 and 2003 in two drains in the Northern Island of New Zealand (Hofstra et al. 2006) reported a reduction in the cover of parrot’s feather Myriophyllum aquaticum after the application of the herbicide triclopyr. This result is not based on statistical tests. The areas occupied by parrot’s feather were greater before herbicide application (35 m2 and 128 m2) than following herbicide application (22 m2 and 2 m2, respectively). Authors reported that native species such as Potamogeton cheesemanii and Persicaria decipiens were either not affected or recovered quickly, although no data were presented. Triclopyr was applied at a concentration of 4 kg/ha into two sections with a low density of parrot’s feather (one 3 m x 2 km and the other 1 km long, being 3 m wide in the first 500 m and 1 m wide in the remaining 500 m). Application occurred during the spring and summer of 2002 to 2003 and vegetation cover was assessed visually.

  6. Parrot’s feather: Use of herbicides - triclopyr

    A small, replicated, controlled, laboratory study conducted between 1999 and 2000 in New Zealand (Hofstra et al. 2006) found that the vegetation cover of parrot’s feather Myriophyllum aquaticum plants treated with triclopyr was lower than that of plants treated with the glyphosate. One year after exposure, the vegetation cover of plants treated with triclopyr ranged between 0 and 13% whereas the vegetation cover of plants treated with glyphosate was 73%. The percentage cover of untreated plants was 83%. Plants were grown for approximately two months prior to herbicide application in 60 l plastic tubs. Triclopyr was applied at concentrations of 2, 4 and 8 kg/ha whereas glyphosate was sprayed onto plants in four tubes at a concentration of 3.2 kg/ha and plants in four tubs were left untreated.

  7. Parrot’s feather: Use of herbicides - other herbicides

    A small, replicated, controlled, laboratory study conducted between 1999 and 2000 in New Zealand (Hofstra et al. 2006) found that the herbicide dichlobenil reduced the growth of parrot’s feather Myriophyllum aquaticum. After 17 weeks, laboratory plants treated with dichlobenil had a lower dry weight (6–21 g) than that of untreated plants (274 g). Plants were grown for approximately two months prior to herbicide application in 60 l plastic tubs. Dichlobenil was sprayed onto plants in three tubs at a concentration of 2 and 4 kg/ha and plants in four tubs were left untreated.

  8. Parrot’s feather: Use of herbicides - other herbicides

    A replicated, controlled field study conducted between 2001 and 2002 in a wetland in the Northern Island of New Zealand (Hofstra et al. 2006) reported treatment with the herbicide dichlobenil reduced vegetation cover of parrot’s feather Myriophyllum aquaticum plants soon after application, but after 28 weeks cover was similar to pre-treatment levels. Results were not subject to statistical tests. After 10 weeks and following a second herbicide application, vegetation cover of treated plants was lower (3–8%) than untreated plants (47%). However, after 28 weeks, vegetation cover of treated plants (70–98%) was similar to that of untreated plants (97%). Authors reported that the increase in vegetation cover resulted from the encroachment of plants from outside sprayed areas rather than due to regrowth in treated plots. Dichlobenil was applied at concentrations of 6.8 and 20.3 kg/ha. Each herbicide concentration was sprayed into three 5 x 5 m plots and three plots were left untreated. Herbicides were applied in early summer (December). A second application took place 51 days after the initial treatment.

  9. Parrot’s feather: Use of herbicides - other herbicides

    A small, replicated, controlled, laboratory study conducted between 1999 and 2000 in New Zealand (Hofstra et al. 2006) found that the biomass of parrot’s feather Myriophyllum aquaticum treated with the herbicide fluridone did not differ significantly from that of untreated plants. After 17 weeks, the dry weight of laboratory plants treated with fluridone (176–216 g) was not significantly different from than that of untreated plants (274 g). Plants were grown for approximately two months prior to herbicide application in 60 l plastic tubs. Fluridone was sprayed onto plants in three tubs at a concentration of 0.1 and 0.5 kg/ha and plants in four tubs were left untreated.

  10. Parrot’s feather: Use of herbicides - other herbicides

    A small, replicated, controlled, laboratory study conducted between 1999 and 2000 in New Zealand (Hofstra et al. 2006) found that the biomass of parrot’s feather Myriophyllum aquaticum treated with the herbicide clopyralid did not differ significantly from that of untreated plants. After 17 weeks, the dry weight of plants treated with clopyralid (132 g) was not significantly different from than that of untreated plants (274 g). Plants were grown for approximately two months prior to herbicide application in 60 l plastic tubs. Clopyralid was sprayed onto plants in three tubs at a concentration of 1.5 kg/ha and plants in four tubes were left untreated.

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