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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: The Use of Field Patrol in Monitoring of Forest Primates and Illegal Hunting Activities in Kakum Conservation Area, Ghana

Published source details

Wiafe E.D. & Amoah M. (2012) The Use of Field Patrol in Monitoring of Forest Primates and Illegal Hunting Activities in Kakum Conservation Area, Ghana. African Primates, 7, 238-245


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Regularly de-activate/remove ground snares Primate Conservation

A before-and-after trial in 2007-2009 in tropical forest in Kakum Conservation Area in Ghana found that the regular removal of ground snares alongside other interventions, led to a decrease in the number of snares recovered by teams over time as well as fewer illegal attempts to hunt primates. More specifically, the number of snares recovered decreased from 452 to 114 (75% decrease). However, no statistical tests were carried out to determine whether this difference was significant. In addition, in 2008-2009, the number of illegal hunting activities and attempts to hunt the bush baby Galagoides demidoff, Bossmann potto Perodicticus potto, Lowe’s monkey Cercopithecus campbelli lowei, spot-nose monkey Cercopithecus petaurista petaurista, olive colobus Procolobus verus, Geoffroy’s pied colobus Colobus vellerosus decreased from 1182 to 874 (26% decrease). Snare removal took place during foot patrols. Teams also regularly conducted randomized anti-poaching patrols. The study does not distinguish between the effects of the different interventions mentioned above.

Conduct regular anti-poaching patrols Primate Conservation

A before-and-after trial in 2007-2009 in tropical forest in Kakum Conservation Area, Ghana (5) found that regular anti-poaching patrols along with other interventions, led to a decrease in illegal hunting activities for six primate species (bush baby Galagoides demidoff, Bossmann potto Perodicticus potto, Lowe’s monkey Cercopithecus campbelli lowei, spot-nose monkey Cercopithecus petaurista petaurista, olive colobus Procolobus verus and Geoffroy’s pied colobus Colobus vellerosus). In 2008-2009, the number of illegal hunting activities and hunting attempts decreased from 1182 to 874 (26% decrease). Monitoring consisted of foot patrols with randomized movements. Monitored illegal activities included the number of poachers arrested and escaped, gunshots heard, firearms confiscated, skins confiscated, poacher’s camps, animals killed, snares found, empty cartridges found and human footprints. Teams also regularly de-activated or removed ground snares. The study does not distinguish between the effects of the different interventions mentioned above.

(Summarised by JJ)