Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciureus) rehabilitation in French Guiana: A case study

Published source details

Vogel I., Glöwing B., Saint P.I., Bayart F., Contamin H. & de T.B. (2002) Squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciureus) rehabilitation in French Guiana: A case study. Neotropical Primates, 10, 147-149


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Captive breeding and reintroduction of primates into the wild: born and reared in cages Primate Conservation

A controlled study in 1998-1999 in tropical forest on an island in French Guiana found that wild-born squirrel monkeys Saimiri sciureus survived for at least 15 weeks, whereas all captive-born monkeys either died or were returned to captivity. All of six wild-born monkeys survived for at least 15 weeks. In contrast, three out of eight captive-born monkeys died and five were returned to captivity. Two individuals died of starvation in release cages, and another was probably killed by resident wild monkeys. One month after release, the remaining five captive-born monkeys were captured and brought back to captivity.

Allow primates to adapt to local habitat conditions for some time before introduction to the wild Primate Conservation

A before-and-after trial in 1998-1999 in tropical forest on an island in French Guiana found that a small number of reintroduced squirrel monkeys Saimiri sciureus that were allowed to adapt to local habitat conditions prior to release along with other interventions, survived over 15 weeks after reintroduction. Six (43%) out of 14 released monkeys survived for at least 15 weeks. Two individuals died in release cages, and one was apparently killed by resident wild squirrel monkey. One month post-release, five monkeys (36%) were rescued and brought back to captivity. The remaining reintroduced six monkeys were all wild-born. Animals were kept as one group in an isolated cage for three months where two females gave birth. After transfer to the release site, they were held in an enclosure 6 x 4 x 4 m in size for four months to adapt to local habitat conditions. The release site was already occupied by resident conspecifics. The study does not distinguish between the effects of the different interventions mentioned above.

Reintroduce primates into habitat where the species is present Primate Conservation

A before-and-after trial in 1998–1999 in tropical forest on an island in French Guiana found that a small number of squirrel monkeys Saimiri scireus that were reintroduced into a habitat already occupied by resident monkeys along with other interventions, survived for 15 weeks after reintroduction. Six of 14 released monkeys (43%) survived for 15 weeks. Two individuals died in release cages, and one was assumed to have been killed by resident squirrel monkeys. One month after release, five monkeys were rescued and brought back to captivity. All six remaining monkeys were wild-born. Eleven weeks after reintroduction, two resident monkeys entered the release group. Animals were kept as one group in a cage at the captive colony where two females gave birth. After transfer to the release site, they were held in an enclosure to adapt to local habitat conditions. The study does not distinguish between the effects of the different interventions mentioned above.

Reintroduce primates in groups Primate Conservation

A before-and-after trial in 1998-1999 in tropical forest on an island in French Guiana found that a small number of reintroduced squirrel monkeys Saimiri sciureus that were released as a group along with other interventions, survived over 15 weeks post-reintroduction. Six (43%) out of 14 released monkeys survived over 15 weeks, after which monitoring ceased. Two individuals died in their release cages, and one was apparently killed by resident wild monkeys. One month after release, five monkeys were recaptured and brought back to captivity. The remaining six monkeys were wild-born; dead and removed individuals were captive-born monkeys. Animals were kept as one group in an isolated cage at the captive colony where two females gave birth. After transfer to the release site, monkeys were held in an enclosure to adapt to local habitat conditions. The study does not distinguish between the effects of the different interventions mentioned above.