Study

Partial recovery and a new population estimate of rhesus monkey populations in India

  • Published source details Southwick C.H. & Siddiqi M.F. (1988) Partial recovery and a new population estimate of rhesus monkey populations in India. American Journal of Primatology, 16, 187-197

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Implement legal protection for primate species under threat

Action Link
Primate Conservation
  1. Implement legal protection for primate species under threat

    A before-and-after trial in 1959-1987 in Aligarh district, Uttar Pradesh, India found that a rhesus macaque Macaca mulatta population recovered after  implementing a national ban on its commercial export. The population increased from 163 monkeys in 1970 to an average of 396 monkeys in 1985-1987 (143% increase). Furthermore, in 1985-1986, 46.1% of the total population was immature (infants or juveniles) compared to 31.1% in 1959-1960, indicating a growing population. No statistical tests were carried out to determine whether this increase was significant. During the first census in 1962, the population of 403 individuals consisted of 21 groups. Since 1970, eight groups survived for at least 18 years. The Indian government banned commercial exports of rhesus macaques in April 1978. The improvement of agricultural production could have been partly responsible for the recovery of the monkey population (no data provided). Surveys across the state of Uttar Pradesh also revealed a population increase (133% increase) as encounter rates increased from 21 monkeys/100 km in 1977-1978 to 49 monkeys/100 km in 1985-1986;  no statistical tests were carried out to determine whether this increase was significant. Population censuses were conducted by car, bicycle and by foot in and around villages and forests.

Output references

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