Study

Habitat preservation and the translocation of threatened groups of golden lion tamarins, Leontopithecus rasalia

  • Published source details Kierulff M.C.M. & de O.P.P. (1994) Habitat preservation and the translocation of threatened groups of golden lion tamarins, Leontopithecus rasalia. Neotropical Primates, 2, 15-18

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Reintroduce primates into habitat where the species is present

Action Link
Primate Conservation

Reintroduce primates in groups

Action Link
Primate Conservation
  1. Reintroduce primates into habitat where the species is present

    A before-and-after trial in 1994 in tropical forest in Brazil found that the majority of golden lion tamarins Leontopithecus rosalia that were translocated from degraded forest patches to protected habitat already occupied by the species, survived for at least two months. All seven monkeys (five adults and two infants) that were captured and translocated survived for at least two months after their release and increased their range over time. No statistical tests were carried out to determine whether this increase was significant. Tamarins were captured by baited traps, weighed, tattooed and all adults were fitted with radio-collars before release. The study does not distinguish between the effects of the different interventions mentioned above.

  2. Reintroduce primates in groups

    A before-and-after trial in 1994 in tropical forest at Fazenda União, Rio das Ostras, Brazil found that the majority of golden lion tamarins Leontopithecus rosalia that were translocated from small, isolated and degraded forest patches outside of the study area and reintroduced in groups into their new habitat where the species was already present, survived for at least two months. All seven monkeys (five adults and two infants) that were captured and translocated survived for at least two months after their release and extended their range over time. No statistical tests were carried out to determine whether this increase was significant. Two other individuals from another forest patch were captured, fitted with radio-collars and followed for 15 days. One tamarin was killed by a domestic dog Canis familiaris domesticus and the other one illegally captured before they could be translocated. Tamarin groups were captured by baited traps, weighed, tattooed and all adults were fitted with radio-collars before release.

Output references

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