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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Gorilla Guardian update: expansion of the community-based monitoring network

Published source details

Jameson C. (2012) Gorilla Guardian update: expansion of the community-based monitoring network. Gorilla Journal, 45, 13-15


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Implement community control of patrolling, banning hunting and removing snares Primate Conservation

A before-and-after study in 2009-2012 in tropical forest near Takamanda National Park, southeastern Cameroon found that after implementing community control and monitoring of illegal activities as part of the Gorilla Guardian programme, no incidents of Cross River gorilla Gorilla gorilla diehli poaching occurred over three years. Guardians were selected by their respective communities and collaborated with local hunters and served as informants reporting threats to gorillas. The programme was started with six guardians from communities in three forest areas near important gorilla sites. Two other communities were added to the network in 2011 and because of increased interest in the programme, yet another two communities joined in 2012. Guardians fulfilled the role of anti-poaching rangers and communities were directly involved in gorilla research and conservation management. The study does not distinguish between the effects of the different interventions mentioned above.

(Summarised by JJ)

Involve local community in primate research and conservation management Primate Conservation

A before-and-after study in 2009-2012 in tropical forest near Takamanda National Park, Cameroon found that after implementing a community-based monitoring network called ‘Gorilla Guardians’ along with other interventions, incidents of Cross River gorilla Gorilla gorilla diehli poaching stopped. Gorilla guardians were selected by their respective communities. Their duties included regularly collecting data on the status and distribution of gorillas, facilitating communication between conservation authorities and their communities, and raising awareness within their communities. The programme was started with six guardians from villages in three forest areas near important gorilla sites. Two other villages were added to the network in 2011 and because of increased interest two more villages joined in 2012. Guardians fulfilled the role of anti-poaching rangers and communities were put in control of the monitoring of illegal activities that threaten gorilla survival in nearby forests. The study does not distinguish between the effects of the different interventions mentioned above.

Provide training to anti-poaching ranger patrols Primate Conservation

A before-and-after study in 2009-2012 in tropical forest in Takamanda National Park, southeastern Cameroon found that after training anti-poaching rangers in the ‘Gorilla Guardian’ programme initiated in 2008 along with other interventions, no more incidents of Cross River gorilla Gorilla gorilla diehli poaching occurred. Guardians were selected by their respective communities and underwent training in gorilla ecology and nest identification, monitoring and data collection and Cameroon wildlife law. The programme started with six guardians from communities in three forest areas near important gorilla sites. Two other communities were added to the network in 2011 and because of increased interest in the programme, two more communities joined in 2012. Communities were put in control of the monitoring of illegal activities that threaten gorilla survival in nearby forests and were directly involved in gorilla research and conservation management. The study does not distinguish between the effects of the different interventions mentioned above.