Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Release of rehabilitated Chlorocebus aethiops to Isishlengeni Game Farm in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Published source details

Guy A.J. (2013) Release of rehabilitated Chlorocebus aethiops to Isishlengeni Game Farm in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Journal for Nature Conservation, 21, 214-216


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Regularly and continuously provide supplementary food to primates Primate Conservation

A before-and-after trial in 2008 in a coastal forest at Isishlengeni Game Farm, Kwazulu-Natal, South Africa found that 62% of rehabilitated vervet monkeys Chlorocebus aethiops that were reintroduced into the wild and whose diets were supplemented with food alongside other interventions, survived for at least six months. Five of 29 introduced individuals (17%) were reported dead. Of these, one died following predation and four were killed by domestic hunting dogs Canis lupus familiaris. Six individuals (21%) went missing. No females reproduced. Fresh fruit, vegetables, nuts and seeds were provided daily as supplementary food. Monkeys were introduced as one troop of 29 individuals into habitat with wild resident monkeys and predators. To acclimatize, monkeys spent two nights in a release enclosure (49 m2) before being released. Medical care was provided when necessary before release and while housed at the nearby rehabilitation centre. The study does not distinguish between the effects of the different interventions mentioned above.

Reintroduce primates into habitat with predators Primate Conservation

A before-and-after trial in 2008 in a coastal forest in Isishlengeni Game Farm, Kwazulu-Natal, South Africa found that that over 60% of rehabilitated vervet monkeys Chlorocebus aethiops that were reintroduced into habitat with predators, along with other interventions, survived for at least six months. Five of 29 introduced individuals (17%) were killed by predators. Six individuals (21%) went missing. No females reproduced. Monkeys were introduced as a troop of 29 individuals into habitat already occupied by the species. To acclimatize, monkeys spent two nights in a release enclosure (49 m2). Monkeys were provided with supplementary food. Medical care was provided when necessary before release and while housed at the nearby rehabilitation centre. The study does not distinguish between the effects of the different interventions mentioned above.

Rehabilitate injured/orphaned primates Primate Conservation

A before-and-after trial in 2008 in a coastal forest at Isishlengeni Game Farm, Kwazulu-Natal, South Africa found that 62% of reintroduced vervet monkeys Chlorocebus aethiops that were rehabilitated before release into the wild along with other interventions, survived for at least six months. Five (17%) of 29 introduced individuals died. Of these, one died of predation and four were killed by domestic dogs Canis lupus familiaris. Six (21%) individuals disappeared. No females reproduced. Monkeys were rehabilitated in a 306.72 m2, 3.2 m high enclosure built on open grassland and enriched with pole planted trees, hanging tyres, ropes, shade cloth hammocks, and a shaded shelter. Monkeys were introduced as one troop of 29 individuals into habitat with wild vervets and predators. Individuals acclimatized by spending two nights in a release enclosure (49 m2) before being released. Monkeys were provided daily supplementary food. Medical care was provided when necessary before release and while housed. The study does not distinguish between the effects of the different interventions mentioned above.

Treat sick/injured animals Primate Conservation

A before-and-after trial in January-July 2008 in a coastal forest at Isishlengeni Game Farm, Kwazulu-Natal, South Africa found that 62% of rehabilitated vervet monkeys Chlorocebus aethiops that were reintroduced into the wild and treated if they showed symptoms of disease before their release along with other interventions, survived for at least six months. Five of 29 introduced individuals (17%) were reported dead. Of these, one died of predation and four were killed by domestic hunting dogs Canis lupus familiaris. Six individuals (21%) went missing. No females reproduced. Medical care was provided on an ‘as required’ basis before release and while housed at the nearby rehabilitation centre. Monkeys were introduced as one troop of 29 individuals into habitat already occupied by wild vervets and with predators. To acclimatize, monkeys spent two nights in a release enclosure (49 m2) before being released. Monkeys were provided daily supplementary food. The study does not distinguish between the effects of the different interventions mentioned above.

Allow primates to adapt to local habitat conditions for some time before introduction to the wild Primate Conservation

A before-and-after trial in January-July 2008 in a coastal forest at Isishlengeni Game Farm, South Africa found that 62% of rehabilitated vervet monkeys Chlorocebus aethiops that were allowed to acclimatize to the new environment before being reintroduced into the wild along with other interventions, survived for at least six months. Five (17%) of 29 introduced individuals were reported dead. Of these, one was predated and four were killed by domestic hunting dogs Canis lupus familiaris. Six individuals (21%) went missing. No females reproduced. To acclimatize, monkeys spent two nights in a release enclosure, 49 m2 in size, 2 m in height, with a 60% shade cloth roof and natural enrichment and roosting places, before being released. Monkeys were introduced as one troop of 29 individuals into habitat already occupied by the species and with predators. Monkeys were provided daily supplementary food. Medical care was provided when necessary before release and while housed at the nearby rehabilitation centre. The study does not distinguish between the effects of the different interventions mentioned above.

Reintroduce primates into habitat where the species is present Primate Conservation

A before-and-after trial in 2008 in a coastal forest in Kwazulu-Natal, South Africa found that 62% of rehabilitated vervet monkeys Chlorocebus aethiops that were reintroduced into habitat already occupied by wild vervets along with other interventions, survived for at least six months. Five of 29 introduced individuals (17%) were reported dead. Of these, one died of predation and four were killed by domestic hunting dogs Canis lupus familiaris. Six individuals (21%) went missing. No females reproduced. Medical care was provided when necessary before release and while housed at the nearby rehabilitation centre. Before being released monkeys spent two nights in a release enclosure (49 m2). Monkeys were provided daily supplementary food. The study does not distinguish between the effects of the different interventions mentioned above.

Reintroduce primates in groups Primate Conservation

A before-and-after trial in 2008 in a coastal forest at Isishlengeni Game Farm, South Africa found that over 60% of rehabilitated vervet monkeys Chlorocebus aethiops that were reintroduced as one large troop into the wild along with other interventions, survived for at least six months. Five (17%) of 29 introduced individuals were reported dead. Of these, one was predated and four were killed by domestic hunting dogs Canis lupus familiaris. Six (21%) individuals went missing. No females reproduced. The release troop included 29 individuals (18 males, 10 females, 1 infant), where sex and age composition of the troop differed significantly from that of wild troops. Monkeys were released into habitat already occupied by wild vervets and with predators. To acclimatize, monkeys spent two nights in a release enclosure (49 m2) before being released. Monkeys were provided daily supplementary food. Medical care was provided when necessary before release and while housed at the nearby rehabilitation centre. The study does not distinguish between the effects of the different interventions mentioned above.