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Individual study: Re-introduction of diademed sifaka (Propithecus diadema) and black and white ruffed lemurs (Varecia variegata editorum) at Analamazaotra Special reserve, eastern Madagascar

Published source details

Day S.R., Ramarokoto R.E.A.F., Sitzmann B.D., Randriamboahanginjatovo R., Ramanankirija H., Randrianindrina V.R.A., Ravololonarivo G. & Louis E.E.J. (2009) Re-introduction of diademed sifaka (Propithecus diadema) and black and white ruffed lemurs (Varecia variegata editorum) at Analamazaotra Special reserve, eastern Madagascar. Lemur News, 14, 32-37


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Habituate primates to human presence to reduce stress from tourists/researchers etc. Primate Conservation

A before-and-after trial in 2006-2007 in evergreen rainforest in Analamazaotra Special Reserve, Madagascar found that translocated black-and-white ruffed lemurs (BWRL) Varecia variegata variegata and diademed sifakas Propithecus diadema that were habituated to human presence before relocation along with other interventions, survived for at least 30 months and reproduced. No mortalities were recorded for BWRL over a 30-month period and only one diademed sifaka died from natural causes. In addition, two sets of BWRL twins (reproductive rate=57%) and seven diademed sifaka infants were born (reproductive rate=26%), the latter of which only two survived. A total of seven BWRL and 27 diademed sifakas were captured at four disturbed forest sites and released in their social units to the reserve where the species had locally gone extinct and that included natural predators. Released primates were monitored with radio-collars. Two to eight months before translocation, lemurs were darted and underwent veterinary checks. The study does not distinguish between the effects of the different interventions mentioned above.

Reintroduce primates into habitat where the species is absent Primate Conservation

A before-and-after trial in 2006–2007 in rainforest in in Madagascar found that black-and-white ruffed lemurs Varecia variegata variegata and diademed sifakas Propithecus diadema that were translocated from disturbed sites to undisturbed habitat where the species was locally extinct, along with other interventions, survived for at least 30 months and reproduced. No deaths were recorded for black-and-white ruffed lemurs over a 30-months while one diademed sifaka died from natural causes. Four black-and-white ruffed lemur offspring twins (reproductive rate=57%) and seven diademed sifaka infants (reproductive rate=26%) were born, with two of the latter surviving. A total of seven black-and-white ruffed lemurs and 27 diademed sifakas were captured at four disturbed forest sites. Before release in their social units lemurs were checked by vets in a forest that contained natural predators. Released primates were habituated to human presence and monitored with the aid of radio-collars. The study does not distinguish between the effects of the different interventions mentioned above.

Translocate (capture & release) wild primates from development sites to natural habitat elsewhere Primate Conservation

A before-and-after trial in 2006-2007 in rainforest in Analamazaotra Special Reserve, Madagascar found that black-and-white ruffed lemurs (BWRL) Varecia variegata variegata and diademed sifakas Propithecus diadema survived for at least 30 months and reproduced after translocation from disturbed sites to undisturbed habitat along with other interventions. No mortalities were recorded for BWRL over a 30-month period and only one diademed sifaka died from natural causes. Two sets of BWRL twins (reproductive rate=57%) and seven diademed sifaka infants were born (reproductive rate=26%), the latter of which two survived. Seven BWRL and 27 diademed sifakas were captured at four disturbed forest sites and released in their social units to the reserve where the species had locally gone extinct and that included natural predators. Released primates were habituated to human presence and monitored with radio-collars. Two to eight months before the translocation was carried out, lemurs were darted and underwent veterinary checks. The study does not distinguish between the effects of the different interventions mentioned above.

Reintroduce primates into habitat with predators Primate Conservation

A before-and-after trial in 2006–2007 in rainforest in Analamazaotra Special Reserve, Madagascar found that habituated black-and-white ruffed lemurs Varecia variegata variegata and diademed sifakas Propithecus diadema survived for at least 30 months and reproduced after they were translocated from disturbed sites to undisturbed habitat with natural predators along with other interventions. No deaths of black-and-white ruffed lemurs were recorded over a 30-month observation period and one diademed sifaka died from natural causes. Four sets of black-and-white ruffed lemurs (reproductive rate=57%) and seven diademed sifaka infants were born (reproductive rate=26%), the latter of which only two survived. Two to eight months before a translocation was carried out, lemurs were darted and underwent veterinary checks. Released primates were habituated to human presence and relocated and monitored with the aid of radio-collars. A total of seven black-and-white ruffed lemurs and 27 diademed sifakas were captured at four disturbed forest sites and released in their social units to the reserve where the species had become locally extinct. The study does not distinguish between the effects of the different interventions mentioned above.

Conduct veterinary screens of animals before reintroducing/translocating them Primate Conservation

A before-and-after study in 2006-2007 in rainforest in Analamazaotra Special Reserve, Madagascar found that black-and-white ruffed lemurs (BWRL) Varecia variegata variegata and diademed sifakas Propithecus diadema survived for at least 30 months and reproduced after they underwent veterinary screens 2-8 months before release along with other interventions. No mortalities were recorded for BWRL over a 30-month observation period, and only one diademed sifaka died from natural causes. Two sets of BWRL twins (reproductive rate=57%) and seven diademed sifaka infants were born (reproductive rate=26%), the latter of which only two survived. A total of seven BWRL and 27 diademed sifakas were captured at four disturbed forest sites and released in their social units to the reserve where the species had locally gone extinct and that included natural predators. Released primates were habituated to human presence and relocated and monitored using radio-collars. The study does not distinguish between the effects of the different interventions mentioned above.

Reintroduce primates in groups Primate Conservation

A before-and-after trial in 2006-2007 in rainforest in Analamazaotra Special Reserve, Madagascar found that black-and-white ruffed lemurs (BWRL) Varecia variegata variegata and diademed sifakas Propithecus diadema that were reintroduced in their social groups after translocation from disturbed sites to undisturbed habitat along with other interventions, survived over 30 months and reproduced. No mortalities were recorded for BWRL over a 30-month observation period and only one diademed sifaka died from natural causes. Two sets of BWRL twins (reproductive rate=57%) and seven diademed sifaka infants were born (reproductive rate=26%), the latter of which only two survived. A total of seven BWRL and 27 diademed sifakas were captured at four disturbed forest sites and released in the reserve where the species had locally gone extinct and that included natural predators. Released primates were habituated to human presence and monitored using radio-collars. Two to eight months before a translocation was carried out, lemurs were darted and underwent veterinary checks. The study does not distinguish between the effects of the different interventions mentioned above.