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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Conservation of primates in the Gola Forest Reserves, Sierra Leone

Published source details

Davies A.G. (1987) Conservation of primates in the Gola Forest Reserves, Sierra Leone. Primate Conservation, 8, 151-153


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Use selective logging instead of clear-cutting Primate Conservation

A site comparison in 1984-1985 in rainforest in Gola Forest Reserves, Sierra Leone found that group densities of three out of six primate species were lower in selectively logged than in unlogged forests. Diana monkeys Cercopithecus diana, spot-nosed monkeys Cercopithecus petaurista, and Campbell's monkeys Cercopithecus campbelli had similar group densities in low-intensity selectively logged and unlogged forest patches. In contrast, group densities of red colobus Procolobus badius, black-and-white colobus Colobus polykomos, and olive colobus Procolobus verus appeared lower in selectively logged than in unlogged forests. Group densities of all species were lower in heavily selectively logged forest than in unlogged or low-intensity selectively logged forests. Group densities for Campbell's monkeys were similar in unlogged and logged forests. Hunting rate was highest in high-intensity selectively logged forests, moderate in selectively logged forests and low in unlogged forests. However, no statistical tests were carried out to determine whether this difference was significant. Sample sizes were small and ranged from one to seven groups. Selective logging involved the cutting of commercial tree species with a girth larger than 2-2.6 m. Three unlogged sites, one low-intensity selectively logged site (eight logged trees/8 ha plot), and one heavily selectively logged site (51 logged trees/8 ha plot) were surveyed by walking a rectangular 2 km trail and mapping primate groups and their calls.

(Summarised by JJ)