Conservation Evidence strives to be as useful to conservationists as possible. Please take our survey to help the team improve our resource.

Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Hoolock gibbon conservation in India

Published source details

Chetry D. & Chetry R. (2011) Hoolock gibbon conservation in India. Gibbon Journal, 6, 7-12


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Provide non-monetary benefits to local communities for sustainably managing their forest and its wildlife (e.g. better education, infrastructure development) Primate Conservation

A before-and-after trial in 2004-2009 in tropical forest in the Gibbon Wildlife Sanctuary in Assam, India found that hoolock gibbons Hoolock hoolock increased by 66% over five years after providing alternative income to local communities along with other interventions. The gibbon population increased from 64 individuals in 17 groups in 2004 to 106 individuals in 26 groups (and five solitary males) in 2009. Canopy cover also increased by 3.5% while degraded forest decreased by 4.1%. No statistical tests were carried out to determine whether these changes were significant. Families within local communities that were selected through socio-economic studies were provided with more efficient stoves, bio-gas plants, handlooms and domestic ducks. Local communities were trained in mushroom cultivation, honeybee keeping and duck husbandry. A large-scale education and awareness programme was implemented to promote gibbon conservation within Assam and training, monitoring and legal orientation programmes were carried out for the sanctuary staff. The study does not distinguish between the effects of the different interventions mentioned above.

Provide training to anti-poaching ranger patrols Primate Conservation

A before-and-after trial in 2004-2009 in tropical forest in the Gibbon Wildlife Sanctuary in Assam, India found that a population of hoolock gibbons Hoolock hoolock increased by 66% over five years after training, monitoring and legal orientation programmes were carried out for the sanctuary staff along with other interventions. The gibbon population increased from 64 individuals in 17 groups in 2004 to 106 individuals in 26 groups (and five solitary males) in 2009. Canopy cover increased by 3.5% and degraded forest decreased by 4.1%. However, no statistical tests were carried out to determine whether these differences were significant. Families within local communities that were selected through socio-economic studies were also provided with more efficient stoves, bio-gas plants, handlooms and ducks. Local communities received alternative income-generation through training in mushroom cultivation, honeybee keeping and duck husbandry and a large-scale education and awareness programme was implemented to promote gibbon conservation within Assam and other northeastern states. The study does not distinguish between the effects of the different interventions mentioned above.

Implement multimedia campaigns using theatre, film, print media, discussions Primate Conservation

A before-and-after trial in 2004-2009 in tropical forest in the Gibbon Wildlife Sanctuary in Assam, India found that hoolock gibbons Hoolock hoolock increased by 66% over five years after implementing an education and awareness programme along with other interventions. The gibbon population increased from 64 individuals in 17 groups in 2004 to 106 individuals in 26 groups (and five solitary males) in 2009. Also, canopy cover increased by 3.5% and degraded forest decreased by 4.1%. However, no statistical tests were carried out to determine whether these differences were significant. The programme reached a total of 33,425 students from primary to college-level within Assam and other northeastern states. Two published books on hoolock gibbons provided the basis for the education programme. In addition, families within local communities that were selected through socio-economic studies were provided with more efficient stoves, bio-gas plants, handlooms and domestic ducks as farm animals in order to improve economic conditions. Local communities also received alternative income-generation through training in mushroom cultivation, honeybee keeping and duck husbandry. Training, monitoring and legal orientation programmes were also carried out for the sanctuary staff. The study does not distinguish between the effects of the different interventions mentioned above.