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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Sacred populations of Cercopithecus sclateri: Analysis of apparent population increases from census counts

Published source details

Baker L.R., Tanimola A.A. & Olubode O.S. (2014) Sacred populations of Cercopithecus sclateri: Analysis of apparent population increases from census counts. American Journal of Primatology, 76, 303-312


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Implement local no-hunting community policies/traditional hunting ban Primate Conservation

A study in June-July 2010 in heavily degraded tropical forest in Lagwa and Akpugoeze communities in Igboland, southeastern Nigeria found that Sclater's monkey Cercopithecus sclateri in both communities in which the species was informally protected by taboos, increased in numbers from 124 to 206 (66% increase) and from 193 to 249 (29% increase) individuals over four years. Average group size increased from 8.3 to 10.8 individuals in Lagwa and from 9.2 to 13.8 individuals in Akpugoeze. Proportion of dependent infants also increased from 12 to 18% in Lagwa and from 8 to 11% in Akpugoeze. Last, numbers of observed monkey groups increased from 15 to 19 in Lagwa, but decreased from 20 to 18 in Akpugoeze. However, no statistical tests were carried out to determine whether these differences were significant. Total counts of groups and numbers of monkeys in each group were conducted using direct observations over a time period of less than two weeks in each community.