Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Rehabilitation and Release of Chimpanzees on a Natural Island - Methods hold promises for other primates as well

Published source details

Agoramoorthy G.H.M.J. (1999) Rehabilitation and Release of Chimpanzees on a Natural Island - Methods hold promises for other primates as well. Journal of Wildlife Rehabilitation, 22, 3-7


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Regularly and continuously provide supplementary food to primates Primate Conservation

A study in 1987-1988 on an island in tropical forest in Liberia found that the majority of reintroduced western chimpanzees Pan troglodytes verus that were provided with food continuously after release alongside other interventions, survived for at least one year. Seven out of 30 released chimpanzees had difficulties to adjust to the new social environment and were brought back to captivity. Food was supplemented daily but chimpanzees also fed on wild food. Chimpanzees were screened for diseases before they were released in groups. Furthermore, they were socialized in naturalistic enclosures and were taught behaviour to facilitate their survival in the wild. On site, primates were allowed to adapt to the local habitat in enclosures for some time; younger and low-ranking individuals were released earlier to reduce stress. Sick and injured animals were temporarily removed to receive medical treatment. The study does not distinguish between the effects of the different interventions mentioned above.

Fostering appropriate behaviour to facilitate rehabilitation Primate Conservation

A study in 1987-1988 on an island in tropical forest in Liberia, West Africa found that the majority of reintroduced western chimpanzees Pan troglodytes verus, that were fostered behaviour to facilitate reintroduction along with other interventions, survived for at least one year. Seven out of 30 released chimpanzees had difficulties to adjust to the new social environment and were brought back to captivity. Chimpanzees were socialized in naturalistic enclosures and taught to find and process food and water, avoid predators, seek or make shelters, and mate and rear offspring. Chimpanzees underwent pre-release health checks and were allowed to adapt to the local habitat in enclosures. Chimpanzees were released in groups and younger and low-ranking individuals were released earlier to reduce stress. Released individuals were continuously provided with food. Sick and injured animals were temporarily removed for treatment. The study does not distinguish between the effects of the different interventions mentioned above.

Treat sick/injured animals Primate Conservation

A study in 1987-1988 on an island with tropical forest in Liberia, West Africa found that the majority of reintroduced western chimpanzees Pan troglodytes verus that were treated when sick alongside other interventions, survived for at least one year post-release. Seven out of 30 released chimpanzees had difficulties to adjust and were brought back into captivity. Three individuals were temporarily removed after release for medical treatment of injuries due to fights with other chimpanzees. Chimpanzees were screened for diseases before they were released in groups. Furthermore, they were socialized in naturalistic enclosures and were taught behaviour to facilitate their survival in the wild. On site, primates were allowed to adapt to the local habitat in enclosures for some time; younger and low-ranking individuals were released earlier to reduce stress. Released chimpanzees were continuously provided with food. The study does not distinguish between the effects of the different interventions mentioned above.

Conduct veterinary screens of animals before reintroducing/translocating them Primate Conservation

A study in 1987-1988 on an island in tropical forest in Liberia, West Africa found that the majority of reintroduced western chimpanzees Pan troglodytes verus that underwent veterinary screens prior to release along with other interventions, survived for at least one year post-release. Seven out of 30 released chimpanzees had difficulties to adjust to the new social environment and were brought back to captivity. Prior to release, individuals were screened for diseases and only healthy chimpanzees were released. Chimpanzees were released in groups. Furthermore, they were socialized in naturalistic enclosures and were taught behaviour to facilitate their survival in the wild. On site, primates were allowed to adapt to the local habitat in enclosures for some time; younger and low-ranking individuals were released earlier to reduce stress. Released chimpanzees were continuously provided with food. Sick and injured animals were temporarily removed and treated. The study does not distinguish between the effects of the different interventions mentioned above.

Allow primates to adapt to local habitat conditions for some time before introduction to the wild Primate Conservation

A study in 1987-1988 on an island in tropical moist forest in Liberia found that the majority of reintroduced western chimpanzees Pan troglodytes verus that were allowed to adapt to the local environment before being released along with other interventions, survived for at least one year. Seven out of 30 released chimpanzees had difficulties to adjust to the new social environment and were brought back to captivity. On site, chimpanzees were allowed to adapt to the local habitat in enclosures for some time; younger and low-ranking individuals were released earlier to reduce stress. Chimpanzees were screened for diseases before release in groups and socialized in naturalistic enclosures where they were taught behaviour to facilitate their survival in the wild. Released chimpanzees were continuously provided with food. Sick and injured animals were temporarily removed and treated. The study does not distinguish between the effects of the different interventions mentioned above.

Reintroduce primates in groups Primate Conservation

A study in 1987-1988 on an island in tropical forest in Liberia found that the majority of western chimpanzees Pan troglodytes verus, that were reintroduced in groups alongside other interventions, survived for at least one year on a natural island. Seven out of 30 released chimpanzees had difficulties to adjust to the new social environment and were brought back to captivity. Chimpanzees were reintroduced in subgroups. Before release, chimpanzees were screened for diseases, were socialized in naturalistic enclosures and were taught behaviour to facilitate their survival in the wild. On site, chimpanzees were allowed to adapt to the local habitat in enclosures for some time; younger and low-ranking individuals were released earlier to reduce stress. Released chimpanzees were continuously provided with food. Sick and injured animals were temporarily removed and treated. The study does not distinguish between the effects of the different interventions mentioned above.